PDF User Manual

  1. Home
  2. Manuals
  3. Lewitt LCT 440 PURE User Manual

Lewitt LCT 440 PURE User Manual

Made by: Lewitt
Type: User Manual
Category: Microphone
Pages: 14
Size: 0.62 MB

 

Download PDF User Manual



Full Text Searchable PDF User Manual



background image

1

1

TRUE-CONDENSER MICROPHONE

FOR ALL APPLICATIONS

//

 

LCT 440

 

PURE

USER MANUAL

THE ESSENCE OF A 

TR

UE

CONDENSER MICR

OPHONE

 


background image

2

1. Introduction  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  . 3

2. Box contents   .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  . 3

3. Features / Top applications    .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  . 3

4. About condenser microphones    .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  . 3

4 .1 . The basic principle of a condenser capsule    .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  . 3
4 .2 . Phantom power explained   .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  . 4
4 .3 . Polar patterns   .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  . 4
4 .4 . Important specs of a condenser microphone   .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  . 5

5. Before you start   .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  . 6

6. Setting up your LCT 440 PURE  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  . 6

7. Recording tips  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  . 7

8. Applications    .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  . 8

8 .1 . Vocals  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  . 8
8 .2 . Guitar amps  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  . 8
8 .3 . Acoustic guitar   .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  . 9
8 .4 . Drums  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  . 9

        8 .5 . Stage use    .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  . 9

9. Tech graph   .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  . 10

10. Specs  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  . 11

// 

Index

11. Accessories .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  . 11

12. Troubleshooting    .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  . 12

13. Safety guidelines    .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  . 13

14. Regulatory information   .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  . 14

15. Warranty   .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  . 14

 


background image

3

4. 

About condenser microphones

 

4.1. 

The basic principle of a condenser capsule 

 

// 

A condenser capsule consists of a diaphragm, that is positioned in close 

proximity to a solid metal plate hence forming a capacitor . This diaphragm is 
electrically conductive .

// 

The lower the mass of the diaphragm, the more sensitive it is to changes in 

sound pressure . In an audible frequency range, we can perceive these changes of 
sound pressure, and commonly refer to them as sound . For our large diaphragm 
microphones of the LCT series, we use 3 μm-thin gold-sputtered Mylar .  

// 

Sound waves hit the diaphragm, making it moving back and forth . As the 

capacitance changes according to the rhythm of incidental sound waves, 
the electronics transform the change in capacitance into alternating voltage  
- mechanical waves are converted into an electrical signal .

// 

Although the induced voltage is relatively high and could, in theory, be audible 

on your headphones, the signal breaks down in an instant due to the internal 
impedance of the capsule . An impedance converter and other electronics like an 
internal amplifier are used to process the induced voltage so that it can be safely 
transmitted to following equipment .

//  

The condenser microphone has to be supplied with external power to generate 

polarization voltage for the capsule and to power the internal electronics . This 
external power source is commonly known as “phantom power” . (Microphones 
with permanently polarized condenser capsules still need phantom power to 
make the internal electronics work .)

1.

 

Introduction

Thank you for choosing a LEWITT product! In this operating manual, you can 
learn more about your LEWITT microphone and its proper usage . We have put 
all our knowledge and passion for audio technology into building microphones 
for people, whose standards for work and performance are as high as our own . 
With the LCT 440 PURE, LEWITT introduces a new large diaphragm condenser 
microphone, which features high-end capsule technology in a sleek and sturdy 
casing . Exceptionally low self-noise, an outstanding dynamic range, and high 
sensitivity allow for recordings of any source with great detail and precision .

2. 

Box contents

//

 LCT 40 SH- Shock mount with  5/8" thread and 3/8" adapter

//

 LCT 50 PSx - Magnetic pop filter

//

 LCT 40 Wx - Windscreen 

//

 DTP 40 Lb - Leatherette transport bag

3. 

Features / Top applications

The LCT 440 PURE is built to record any sound source at a high level of detail and 
precision . In doing so, it will always retain the musical character of the recorded sound 
source . Use it to record vocals, drums, guitar amps, acoustic instruments or any other 
instrument, and you will be astonished by its versatility and clarity . Due to its sturdy 
and compact housing, it is as suitable for live situations as it is for studio work, where 
it will never grow tired of surprising you with its quality sound, over and over again .

 


background image

4

// 

How to read a polar pattern diagram 

First of all, you have to be able to read a polar pattern diagram properly . It contains 
all necessary information you need to foresee the result during recording . 
 
Think  of  a  a  360°  field  surrounding  the  microphone.  0°  is  the  “front”  of  the 
microphone and the angle where the microphone has its maximum sensitivity . 
The scale of the circle consists of smaller circles, each representing a 5 dB 
decrease in sensitivity .
 
The decibel (dB) is a logarithmic unit to compare two values. If the specification 
of a cardioid pattern microphone states it has a rear rejection of 25 dB, it means 
that the most sensitive part (0°) is compared with the least sensitive part (180°) .
 
For (sound) pressure, current and voltage +6 dB is double the signal strength, 
+20 dB leads to 10 times the signal .  A typical rear rejection for a cardioid pattern 
is about -20 dB . Sound coming from the back of the microphone is picked up at 
1/10th sensitivity relative to the front signal . 
 

// 

Cardioid

The most commonly used polar 
pattern is most sensitive at 0° and 
least sensitive at 180° . You cannot go 
wrong using this for most recording 
applications . It is easy to get a dry 
signal as the cardioid pattern blends 
out a bad sounding room, a noisy fan 
in the background, etc .  

4.2.

 

Phantom power explained 

// 

All condenser microphones require an external power source called “Phantom 

Power” to generate polarization voltage for the capsule and to power the circuitry . 
Without phantom power, a condenser microphone will not work .

// 

Phantom power is a DC voltage, that can be supplied by an audio interface, 

mixing console, pre-amplifier or a designated phantom power supply unit.   

// 

Phantom power needs to be switched on using a designated button located 

on the audio interface, preamp, or other recording devices . In most cases,  
the designated button reads “P48” or “Phantom Power” .  

// 

Phantom power is always supplied via the connected standard 3-pin XLR cable 

and does not require any other connector or cable in addition to that . 

// 

When activating phantom power, a sound can be audible - this is perfectly 

normal . You can mute the microphone channel while turning on phantom power 
to avoid this sound .

4.3. 

Polar patterns 

It is important to understand the basic principles of polar patterns to get the best out 
of every recording . The polar pattern of a microphone determines the sensitivity on 
different angles. In other words, it defines how much of the signal will be picked up 
by the microphone from different directions . By selecting the right pattern, you can 
avoid unwanted sound sources to bleed into your signal, adjust the mix between dry 
and room sound or change the frequency response and handling noise sensitivity .

Polar graph frequency

1 .000 Hz

180˚

0

-10

30˚

330˚

150˚

210˚

60˚

120˚

300˚

240˚

90˚

270˚

Figure 4 .1

 


background image

5

Example: if a microphone has an equivalent noise level (self-noise) of 10 dB (A) 
SPL and picks up a sound source with 10 dB (A) SPL the signal to noise ratio is 
1:1 or 50/50 .  
 
A low noise level helps to keep the signal clean when recording quiet sources! 
The range between the equivalent noise level and the maximum sound pressure 
level is referred to as the dynamic range of a microphone .
 
Spoken in practical terms, low self-noise does not limit your freedom of 
microphone positioning . With noisy microphones, you need to get very close to 
the recorded sound source to get a good signal-to-noise ratio . A low self-noise 
microphone, on the other hand, can record not only distant but also very quiet 
sound sources . With its 7 dB (A) of equivalent noise level it is guaranteed that 
your studio microphone is never the cause of noise problems .

// 

Frequency response

The frequency response shows the sensitivity over the microphone’s frequency 
spectrum and has a huge influence on the “sound” of a microphone. See section 
9 Tech graph for the frequency response chart .
 

// 

MAX SPL

LCT 440 PURE - Max . SPL for 0 .5 % THD: 140 dBSPL

Manufacturers state the maximum sound pressure level a microphone can 
handle before the signal starts to distort . In sound reproduction, we often aim for 
a “pure”, undistorted signal . When distortion becomes audible, depends on the 
source material and the listener’s perception . Most manufacturers state the MAX 
SPL at 0 .5% THD (Total Harmonic Distortion), measured at 1kHz . 

4.4.

 

Important specs of a condenser microphone 

// 

Sensitivity 

LCT 440 PURE - Sensitivity: 27 .4 mV/Pa, -31 .2 dBV/Pa

You can often read that a condenser microphone has a “high” sensitivity . What 
does that mean in practical terms? In short, it means that a more sensitive 
microphone  is  “hotter”  –  i.e.  it  requires  less  gain  (amplification)  to  achieve  
a certain output level . You can specify a microphone’s sensitivity in two ways:  
in mV/Pa or dBV/Pa .

“27 .4 mV/Pa” means, the microphone produces an output signal of 27 .4 mV 
when it is being exposed to 1 Pascal (1Pa = 94 dB SPL) . “-31 .2 dBV/Pa“ means, 
the microphone produces an output signal of -32 .7 dBV when it is being exposed 
to 1 Pascal (1Pa = 94 dB SPL) . This value is more practical, as dB values are easily 
comparable .

LCT 440 PURE: -31 .2 dBV/Pa .
Microphone X: -51 .2 dBV/Pa . Microphone X would need an extra gain of 20 dB to 
produce the same output level as the LCT 440 PURE .
 

// 

Equivalent noise level or self-noise

LCT440 PURE - Equivalent noise level: 7 dB (A)

Self-noise or, more accurately, equivalent noise level is the sound pressure level 
that is equal to the RMS voltage that can be measured at the output connector 
of a microphone without an external sound source being recorded . In other 
words, there is a sound pressure level that matches the inherent self-noise of the 
microphone . This sound pressure level is the equivalent noise level (self-noise) of 
the microphone .

 


background image

6

// 

If you are planning to record vocals or spoken word, make sure to use the 

supplied LCT 50 PSx magnetic pop filter. The pop filter prevents plosive sounds 
that are overloading the signal . Plosive sounds are occurring when pronouncing 
aspirated plosives, which are sounds that are accompanied by a strong burst of 
breath, e .g . P(opping) in spoken language .

// 

The  pop  filter  also  prevents  the  capsule  being  exposed  to  moisture,  and  in 

addition to that, it looks great .

// 

Loosen the adjustment screw on the back of the shock mount . Adjust the angle 

and then fastened it securely .

// 

The LEWITT logo indicates the front of the microphone . The front should always 

face the sound source you are planning to record .

// 

Connect the LCT 440 PURE via standard 3-pin XLR cable to your recording 

device or preamp . Make sure it is capable of providing 48V phantom power (P48) .

// 

Mute your microphone channel before you turn the phantom power on - it 

produces a loud switch-on sound .

// 

Set the input gain on your recording interface according to the sound source 

you want to record .Just play or sing the loudest part of the track you are about to 
record and find the right gain setting. With having your peaks around -12 dBFS 
you will be save in most cases, and do not need to worry about ugly distortions 
but still have a good signal-to-noise ratio .

5.

 

Before you start

 
Before you can start recording, you should check if you have all the necessary 
equipment . A microphone alone is not able to complete this task - not even ours .  

// 

Nowadays the easiest and most uncomplicated way is to buy a microphone and 

an audio interface that you can connect to your computer . This setup is the most 
cost-efficient recording solution.

// 

Make sure that your audio interface has an XLR-input channel that can supply 

48V phantom power .

// 

You are also going to need a 3-pin XLR cable and a sturdy microphone stand .

// 

There are several software solutions (DAW = Digital Audio Workstation) available 

that serve as your digital studio . Their functionality ranges from basic recording 
functions to studio professionality .

6.

 

Setting up your LCT 440 PURE

// 

The LCT 440 PURE comes with the LCT 40 SH shock mount . A shock mount 

isolates the microphone from structure-borne noise . Attach the LCT 40 SH 
shock mount to a stable and sturdy microphone stand . Place the LCT 440 PURE 
in the shock mount and secure it by fastening the threaded nut turning it counter-
clockwise . Make sure the LEWITT logo faces the open side of the shock mount!  

 


background image

7

Most of the time it is unlikely to get a completely quiet room, but that is not a big 
problem . Try to position the microphone and sound sources you like to record 
away from unwanted noise sources . As the LCT 440 PURE features a cardioid 
pattern with an excellent rear rejection, meaning that your microphone is a lot 
less sensitive to sound coming from the back

// 

The proximity effect 

The closer you position your microphone to your sound source, the more 
pronounced is the lower frequency range . This effect is called the proximity 
effect, and names the phenomenon of the increase of low frequency response . 
It helps your vocals or instruments to sound fuller and warmer, but it is essential 
to find the right balance, as too much low end in your vocals might get in the way 
of the frequency range of other instruments . And guitar recordings, for example, 
tend to sound muddy with too much low-end being recorded .

7.

 

Recording tips

In the following chapters we will provide you with some basic tips about recording . 
Take this as a rough guide, not as hard rules . Take your time to experiment and 
don’t be afraid to try different things. Always listen to your ears! In a very simplified 
analogy, you can think of the mic as a flashlight. Whatever your “beam of light” 
illuminates, will be in the focus of your recording .

// 

Room sound 

Try different rooms if you have the possibility, every location sounds different . A 
living room with shelves, couches, and carpet will sound balanced, quite dry and 
will be suitable for most situations . A bathroom will sound more lively due to its 
reflective tiles. For some scenarios, it can be an interesting place to record vocals 
or acoustic instruments . Long story short: Finding the right location can make a 
big difference . Just be creative .

// 

Microphone positioning 

Always spend enough time on positioning your microphone . Even the smallest 
changes  can  make  a  huge  difference  to  the  final  results.  Remember  that  mic 
positioning is one of the things that heavily define the quality and sound of your 
recording, but cannot be changed after the recording process is completed . If you 
are trying out different microphone positions, make sure that your EQ settings 
are  flat  on  your  DAW,  channel  strip,  audio  interface,  mixing  console,  etc.  This 
way you can clearly hear the differences in frequency response that occur from 
different microphone positions relative to your sound source .

// 

Sensitive microphones 

Sensitive microphones pick up all sounds in a room . You may not notice unwanted 
sounds right away, take a minute to check for noises from outside, fans, air 
conditioners, creaking floors and so on.

 


background image

8

//

 A cardioid pattern is perfect to get a very defined, articulated, and dry recording. 

A dry recording gives you the freedom to add reverb (or other effects) to your 
vocal track later on according to your needs . You can always add reverb, but it is 
very difficult to almost impossible to reduce your room sound in post-production 
without loss of signal quality .

//

 If your vocals sound too bright, try to sing into the microphone slightly from 

the side. The sound changes depending on the angle and you might find a more 
suitable one for your recording .

8.2.

 

Guitar amps

//

 To record a guitar or bass cabinet, start with pointing your microphone towards 

the speaker’s center. From there, start moving your mic outwards until you find 
a suitable sound . In the center, the speaker’s cone, the sound is the brightest . 
Especially when miking speakers, slight changes in position can produce a 
completely different sound . Experiment with the position (angle and distance) 
of the mic, or use more than one mic to get a fuller and more unique sound .  
We suggest using an additional MTP 440 DM .

8.3.

 

Acoustic guitar

//

 An easy and very common way to record acoustic guitar using only one 

microphone is to place it 20-30 cm away from the instrument, pointing towards 
the area where the neck and body meet . If you are using two microphones, point 
one towards the 12th fret, the other one points towards the soundhole .

8.

 

Applications

 
A condenser microphone is a classic go-to microphone for studio work, as it can 
capture every subtle nuance of the sound source, therefore delivering natural 
and detailed sound . Of course, it can also be used for many stage applications, 
for  example  cymbals,  amplifiers,  overheads,  background  vocals,  acoustic 
instruments, and more .

8.1.

 

Vocals

// 

Start by attaching the LCT 50 PSx magnetic pop filter to the LCT 40 SH shock 

mount . It not only helps to avoid plosives and hisses on your recording but also 
protects the condenser capsule from being exposed to moisture .

// 

Define a distance that the vocalist is supposed to keep relative to the microphone. 

Depending on the voice and the style of the vocalist this distance may vary (even 
during the recording) . Try starting with a short distance of approximately 15 cm . 
Use tape to mark a spot on the floor.

//

 The further away you are from the microphone, the more room sound you end 

up recording besides your voice .

// 

The closer you are relative to your microphone, the more pronounced is your 

lower frequency range . This effect is called the proximity effect, and basically 
names the phenomenon of the increase of low frequency response, the closer 
you get to the microphone . It helps your vocals to sound fuller and warmer, but 
it is very important to find the right balance, as too much low end in your vocals 
might get in the way of the frequency range of other instruments .

 


background image

9

8.4.

 

Drums

//

 Although you often see drums being miked with lots of microphones, you can 

achieve good results using a single large-diaphragm condenser microphone . 
Especially for pre-production, or demo-recordings, it is an uncomplicated way to 
record your ideas or song-structures . The front-of-kit position is recommended 
for those scenarios; it records all parts of the kit, but it also delivers a punchy 
sound coming from the kick . If you want to upgrade your sound using another 
mic:

1)

 Take a dynamic microphone like the DTP 340 REX and complement your 

setup by miking the kick as well . Move the condenser microphone to an overhead 
position .  With hole in kick drum skin: A good starting position is half-way in, 
pointing towards the beater, try different angles until you are satisfied.

Without hole: position it close to the skin, starting from the center, moving 
outwards until you find a pleasant sound. Also vary the distance, but be aware, 
the further away, the more bleed you get from other parts of the drum kit .

2)

 Adding a snare mic – Try to position the snare mic in a way that it does not pick 

up too much sound coming from the hi-hat . Use the rear rejection of the cardioid 
pattern to achieve a clean snare recording . Start by positioning the mic above the 
rim, pointing to the center of the snare drum . Try varying the angle and also the 
distance . A good starting distance is around 5 cm between capsule and rim .

8.5.

 

Stage use

Of course, a condenser microphone can also be used for many stage applications, 
for example, cymbals, amplifiers, overheads, vocals, acoustic instruments, and 
more . Although condenser microphones are highprecision tools, they are not as 
fragile as their reputation may suggest . Today’s manufacturing standards allow 
us to build condenser microphones that can be used in the studio as well as on 
stage, so there is no need to worry – just please do not throw it around . It is 
always recommended to handle tools with appropriate care . It helps to sustain 
their longevity .

 


background image

10

9.

 

Tech graphs

//

 Check out the interactive tech graph 

here . 

Polar graph frequency

125 Hz

250 Hz

500 Hz

1 .000 Hz

2 .000 Hz

4 .000 Hz

8 .000 Hz

16 .000 Hz

180˚

0

-10

30˚

330˚

150˚

210˚

20 Hz

-20 dB

-10 dB

0 dB

10 dB

20 dB

50

100

200

500

1 .000

2k

5k

10k

20k

60˚

120˚

300˚

240˚

90˚

270˚

Polar graph frequency

125 Hz

250 Hz

500 Hz

1 .000 Hz

2 .000 Hz

4 .000 Hz

8 .000 Hz

16 .000 Hz

180˚

0

-10

30˚

330˚

150˚

210˚

20 Hz

-20 dB

-10 dB

0 dB

10 dB

20 dB

50

100

200

500

1 .000

2k

5k

10k

20k

60˚

120˚

300˚

240˚

90˚

270˚

Polar graph frequency

125 Hz

250 Hz

500 Hz

1 .000 Hz

2 .000 Hz

4 .000 Hz

8 .000 Hz

16 .000 Hz

180˚

0

-10

30˚

330˚

150˚

210˚

20 Hz

-20 dB

-10 dB

0 dB

10 dB

20 dB

50

100

200

500

1 .000

2k

5k

10k

20k

60˚

120˚

300˚

240˚

90˚

270˚

Figure 9 .1 - Frequency response of the LCT 440 PURE

Figure 9 .2 - Polar graph of the LCT 440 PURE

 


background image

11

10.

 

Specifications

Type

Condenser, externally polarized

Acoustical operating principle

Pressure gradient transducer

Diaphragm

3 micron gold sputtered Mylar

Transducer Ø

25 .4 mm, 1 in 

Polar pattern

Cardioid 

Sensitivity

27 .4 mV/Pa, -31 .2 dBV/Pa

Signal / noise ratio

87 dB (A) 

Dynamic range

133 dB (A)

Equivalent noise level

7 dB (A)

Max. SPL for 0.5 % THD

140 dBSPL

Supply voltage

48 V +/- 4 V

Current consumption

2 .63 mA 

Internal impedance

110 

Ω

Rated load impedance

1,000 

Ω

Connector

Gold plated 3-pin XLR

Mic enclosure

Zinc die cast

Microphone dimensions

138 x 52 x 36 mm, 5 .43 x 2 .04 x 1 .42 in

Microphone net weight

310 g, 10 .9 oz

Table 10 .1

Microphones measured according to: IEC 60268-4

Phantom power according to: IEC 61938

Noise measurement according to: IEC 60268-1

11.

 

Accessories

// 

LCT 40 SH - shock mount 

A shock mount is recommended for most recording applications as it reduces 
unwanted structure-borne noise . The open front of the shock mount allows you 
to position the microphone as close as you like to the source .

// 

LCT 50 PSx - magnetic pop filter  

The magnetic pop filter was designed to perfectly integrate with the design of the 
microphone and its shock mount. A pop filter not only helps to avoid plosives and 
hisses on your recording, but also protects the condenser capsule from being 
exposed to moisture .

// 

LCT 40 Wx – windscreen 

This one is especially useful when using the microphone outdoors, to shield the 
capsule from wind . Can also be used for vocal recordings, to protect the capsule 
from moisture .

//

 

DTP 40 Lb - transport bag 

Microphones which are not in use should not remain on the stand gathering dust 
or be unnecessarily exposed to humidity . Unmount it from the shock mount and 
put it into the supplied DTP 40 Lb transport bag .

//

 DTP 40 Mts - Mic mount (optional)

Rubber  microphone  mount.  Provides  firm  grip  and  attenuates  structure-borne 
noise . Compatible with 3/8“ and 5/8“ threads .

 


background image

12

12.

 

Troubleshooting

I cannot hear anything! 
 

//

 Check if phantom power (P48) is switched on . A condenser microphone always 

needs to be supplied with 48V phantom power to work .

//

 Check your whole signal chain one by one and check if all connected equipment 

is supplied with sufficient electrical power.

// 

Check if your audio interface, mic-preamp, or other subsequent equipment 

receives an input signal .

//

 Check if all cables are well connected and functional .

My signal sounds distorted, what can I do? 
 

// 

Check and adjust input gain on your audio interface, mic-preamp, or other 

subsequent equipment – always make sure you leave sufficient headroom.

//

 Plosives sounds during vocal recordings can overload the capsule – use the 

supplied pop filter and/or keep a greater distance between source and microphone.

// 

Structure-borne  noise  –  use  a  fitting  shock  mount  (preferably  the  supplied 

accessory) .
 

My recording sounds muffled! 
 

// 

Make sure the Lewitt logo is facing the sound source during recording .

// 

To record with full sensitivity do not cover any part of the wire mesh .

 


background image

13

13.

 

Safety guidelines

Lewitt GmbH shall not be liable for consequences of an inappropriate use 
of the product not complying with the technical allowance in the user manual 
such as handling errors, mechanical spoiling, false voltage and using other 
than the recommended correspondence devices . Any liability of Lewitt GmbH 
for any damages including indirect, consequential, special, incidental and 
punitive damages based on the user’s non-compliance with the user manual 
or unreasonable utilization of the product is hereby excluded as to the extent 
permitted by law . This limitation of liability for damages is not applicable for the 
liability under European product liability codes or for users in a state or country 
where such damages cannot be limited .

Please note: 

//

 The capsule is a sensitive, high precision component . Make sure you do not 

drop it from high heights and avoid strong mechanical stress and force .

//

 To make sure that the microphone’s high sensitivity and sound reproduction 

quality is sustained, avoid exposing it to moisture, dust or extreme temperatures .

//

 Do not apply extensive force when disconnecting a cable, always pull on the 

connector and not on the cable itself .

//

 Microphones which are not in use should not remain on the stand gathering 

dust or be unnecessarily exposed to humidity . Store it in a dry and safe space .

//

 Do not attempt to modify or fix the microphone as it would void your product 

warranty .

//

 The casing of the microphone can be cleaned easily using a wet cloth, never 

use alcohol or another solvent for cleaning .

// 

Keep this product out of the reach of children .

// 

Please also refer to the owner’s manual of the component to be connected  

to the microphone .

 


background image

14

14.

 

Regulatory information

This device complies with Part 15 of the FCC Rules . 
Operation is subject to the following two conditions: 
(1) This device may not cause harmful interference, and 
(2) This device must accept any interference received, 
including interference that may cause undesired operation .
 
Declaration of conformity can be requested at

 info@lewitt-audio.com

 
Manufacturer Details 
Lewitt GmbH 
Burggasse 79 
1070 Vienna, Austria

DI Roman Perschon

CEO LEWITT GmbH

15.

 

Warranty

All products manufactured by LEWITT GmbH feature a limited two-year warranty . 
This  two-year  warranty  is  specific  to  the  date  of  purchase  as  shown  on  your 
purchase receipt . 

LEWITT GmbH shall satisfy the warranty obligations by remedying any material or 
manufacturing faults free of charge at LEWITT’s discretion either by repair or by 
exchanging individual parts or the entire appliance . Any defective parts removed 
from a product during the course of a warranty claim shall become the property 
of LEWITT GmbH . While under warranty period, defective products may be 
returned to the authorized LEWITT dealer together with original proof of purchase .  
To avoid any damages in transit, please use the original packaging if available . 
Please do not send your product to LEWITT GmbH directly as it will not be serviced .  
Freight charges have to be covered by the owner of the product .
 
For further information, please visit www.lewitt-audio.com.