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Levenhuk Skyline 80?400 AZ User Manual

Skyline 76?700 AZ Skyline 70?700 AZ Skyline 102?1000 AZ

Made by: Levenhuk
Type: User Guide
Category: Telescope
Pages: 18
Size: 1.31 MB

 

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Refractor telescopes:

Levenhuk 
Levenhuk 

Skyline 7

6

х700 AZ

Levenhuk 

Skyline 70х700 AZ

Levenhuk 

Skyline 102х1000 AZ

Skyline 80х400 AZ 

User Guide

 


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All parts of the telescope will arrive in one box. Be careful unpacking it. We recommend keeping 
the original shipping containers. In the event that the telescope needs to be shipped to another 
location, having the proper shipping containers will help ensure that your telescope survives the 
journey intact. Make sure all the parts are present in the packaging. Be sure to check the box 
carefully, as some parts are small. No tools are needed other than the ones provided. All screws 
should be tightened securely to eliminate flexing and wobbling, but be careful not to overtighten 
them, or the threads may strip.

During assembly (and anytime, for that matter), do not touch the surfaces of the telescope 
objective lens, the lenses of the finderscope, or eyepiece lenses with your fingers. The optical 
surfaces have delicate coatings on them that can easily be damaged if touched inappropriately. 
Never remove any lens assembly from its housing, or the product warranty will be null and void.

Congratulations on your purchase of high-quality Levenhuk telescope!

These telescopes are designed for high-resolution viewing of astronomical objects. With their 
precision optics, you will be able to locate and enjoy hundreds of fascinating celestial objects, 
including the planets, the Moon, and a variety of deep-sky galaxies, nebulas, and star clusters.

If you have never owned a telescope before, we would like to welcome you to amateur 
astronomy. Take some time to familiarize yourself with the night sky. Learn to recognize the 
patterns of stars in the major constellations. With a little practice, a little patience, and a 
reasonably dark sky away from city lights, you'll find your telescope to be a never-ending source 
of wonder, exploration, and relaxation.

These instructions will help you set up, properly use, and care for your telescope. Please read 
them thoroughly before getting started.

Congratulations

!

CAUTION! 

Never look directly at the Sun – even for an instant – through your telescope or 
finderscope without a professionally made solar filter that completely covers the front of 
the instrument, or it may result in permanent eye damage. To avoid damage of the 
internal parts of your telescope make sure the front end of the finder scope is covered 
with aluminum foil or another non-transparent material. Children should use the 
telescope under adult supervision only.

 


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Dust cap
Dew cap
Objective lens
Telescope tube
Finderscope
Finderscope base
Adjustment screws
Lock screw 
Eyepiece
Diagonal mirror
Focuser tube

Focusing knob
Azimuth slow-motion control rod
Azimuth lock knob
Fork mount
Altitude lock knob
Mount lock knob
Accessory tray
Tripod leg
Tripod lock knob

A

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a

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Levenhuk 

Skyline 80х400 AZ 

A.
В.
С.
D.

Е.

F.

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H.

I.

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K.

   

L.
1.

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a. 

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L

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B

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D

F

G

 

H

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1

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4

3

a

b

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Dust cap
Dew cap
Objective lens
Ring clamps
Telescope tube
Finderscope
Finderscope base 
Adjustment screws
Focuser tube
Eyepiece

Diagonal mirror
Focusing knob
Azimuth slow-motion control
Altitude slow-motion control
Azimuth locking knob
Tube rings
Accessory tray
Tripod leg
Tripod locking knob

Levenhuk 

Skyline 70х700 AZ

A.
В.
С.
D.

Е.

F.

G.
H.

I.

J.

   

K.

L.
1.

2.
3.
4.
a. 

b.

c.

           

 


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Slowly loosen the tripod locking knobs and gently pull out the lower section of each tripod leg. 
Tighten the screws to hold the legs in place. 
Spread the tripod legs apart to stand the tripod upright. 
Adjust the height of each tripod leg until the tripod head is properly leveled. Note that the 
tripod legs may not be the same length when the mount is leveled.
Place the accessory tray on top of the bracket, and secure it with thumbscrews from 
underneath. 

Tripod assembly

Telescope assembly 

Telescope assembly

For models with non-bracket ring clamps:

Remove the ring clamps from the telescope tube by releasing their thumb nuts and opening their 
hinges. Fasten the ring clamps to the mount with a wrench. Place the telescope tube between 
the rings and balance it. Close the hinges around the telescope and retighten the thumbscrews. 
Do not overtighten.

 


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For models with bracket ring clamps:

Remove the ring clamps from the telescope tube by releasing their thumb nuts and opening their 
hinges. Fasten the bracket with ring clamps to the mount through one of three holes. To lock the 
bracket, rotate the black riffled wheel inside the mount base. Place the telescope tube between 
the rings and balance it. Close the hinges around the telescope and retighten the thumbscrews. 
Do not overtighten.

Assembling slow-motion controls: 

attach the slow-motion controls to the worm gear 
mechanisms and tighten the locking screws.

Finderscope assembly: 

insert the finderscope base into the bracket on the 
tube and tighten locking screws.

 


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Diagonal mirror and eyepiece assembly:

Loosen the focuser thumbscrew. Insert the diagonal 
mirror into the focuser tube and retighten the 
thumbscrew to hold the diagonal mirror in place. Then 
insert the desired eyepiece into the diagonal mirror 
and secure it by retightening the thumbscrew.

Finderscope assembly: 

unthread two screws in the back of the telescope tube. 
Place the finderscope base above the holes on the tube. 
Lock the finderscope base into position by tightening the 
screws.

 

Models with fork mount 

Remove the locking screw from the slow-motion control rod.
Insert the rod into the hole on the side of the fork mount.
Place the telescope tube between fork arms so that holes on the tube match the arm holes. 
Fasten the telescope tube to the mount with thumbscrews.
Fasten the other end of the rod to the telescope tube by inserting the screw through shaft and 
tube holes and tightening it.

 


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Optical finderscope

Optical finderscopes are very useful accessories. When they are correctly aligned with the 
telescope, objects can be quickly located and brought to the center of the view. Alignment is 
best done outdoors in day light when it's easier to locate objects. If it is necessary to refocus 
your finderscope, sight on an object that is at least 500 yards away. 

For 5x24 and 6x24 finderscopes: turn the scope end to adjust the focus. For 6x30 finderscope 
loosen the locking ring by unscrewing it back toward the bracket. The front lens holder can now 
be turned in and out to focus. When focus is reached, lock it in position with the locking ring.

To align the finderscope, choose a distant object that is at least 500 yards away and point the 
telescope at the object. Adjust the telescope so that the object is in the center of the view in 
your eyepiece. Check the finderscope to see if the object is also centered on the crosshairs. 

For 5x24 and 6x24 finderscopes: use three adjustment screws to center the finderscope 
crosshairs on the object. For 6x30 finderscopes: adjust two windage screws only.

Red dot finder

The red dot finder is a zero magnification pointing tool that uses a coated glass window to 
superimpose the image of a small red dot onto the night sky. The red dot finder is equipped with 
a variable brightness control, azimuth and altitude adjustment screws. The finder is powered by 
a 3-volt lithium battery located underneath at the front. To use the red dot finder, simply look 
through the sight tube and move your telescope until the red dot overlaps the object. Make sure 
to keep both eyes open when sighting.

Finderscope assembly

 


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Like all finderscopes, the red dot finder must be properly aligned with the telescope before use. 
This is a simple process using the azimuth and altitude adjustment screws:

Open the battery compartment by pulling down the cover and remove the plastic shipping cover 
over the battery.
Turn on the red dot finder by rotating the variable brightness control clockwise until you hear a 
click. Continue rotating the control knob to increase the brightness level.
Insert a low power eyepiece into the focuser. Locate a bright object and aim the telescope, so 
that the object is in the center of the field of view.
With both eyes open, look through the sight tube at the object. If the red dot overlaps the 
object, your red dot finder is perfectly aligned. If not, turn its azimuth and altitude adjustment 
controls until the red dot overlaps the object.

The AZ2 mount 

is an alt-azimuth mount, which allows you to rotate the telescope about the 

vertical and horizontal axes and vary its altitude and azimuth. To adjust the azimuth, loosen the 
big locking knob under the mount base and rotate the tube left or right about the axis then 
retighten it. To adjust the altitude, loosen the altitude adjustment knob and rotate the tube. For 
more precise motions, use the altitude slow-motion control.

The AZ3 mount 

has slow-motion controls for both conventional altitude (up-down) and azimuth 

(left-right) directions of motion. To align it roughly, loosen the azimuth knob, rotate the tube 
about the axis and retighten the knob. For more precise adjustments, use slow-motion controls. 
Since slow-motion controls have limited movement, it is recommended to keep them centered 
before aiming the telescope.

Due to Earth's movement, the objects will be constantly shifting out of your view, so you will 
have to adjust the altitude and azimuth of your telescope to continue your observations.

Operating the mount

 

Altitude

 

adjustment

 

knob

Brightness

 

control

Azimuth

 

adjustment

 

knob

Scope

Battery

 

compartment

 

cover

 


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A Barlow lens increases the magnifying power of an eyepiece, while reducing the field of view. It 
expands the cone of the focused light before it reaches the focal point, so that the telescope's 
focal length appears longer to the eyepiece. In addition to increasing magnification, the benefits 
of using a Barlow lens include improved eye relief, and reduced spherical aberration of the 
eyepiece. For this reason, a Barlow plus a lens often outperform a single lens producing the same 
magnification. And the best advantage is that a Barlow lens can potentially double the number of 
eyepieces in your collection.

Barlow lens

Reference materials usually list declination coordinates in degrees, hours and minutes above or 
below the horizon line. Azimuth coordinates may sometimes be listed with the compass points (N, 
SW, ENE, etc.), but it is more commonly listed in degrees around the 360-deg plane, where north 
is 0°, east is 90°, etc.

(90°)

(180°)

S

E

(270°)

W

Nadir

(0°/360°)

N

Rotation around 
the azimuth axis

Zenith

Meridian

 

Latitude

Nadir

Eyepiece

Barlow

 

lens

Diagonal mirror

 


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Наведение телескопа

Slowly rotate the focus knobs under the focuser one way or the 
other until the image in the eyepiece is sharp. The image 
usually has to be finely refocused over time, due to small 
variations caused by temperature changes, flexures, etc. This 
often happens with short focal ratio telescopes, particularly 
when they haven't yet reached outside temperature. Refocusing 
is almost always necessary when you change an eyepiece, add 
or remove a Barlow lens.

To attach a camera to your telescope you may need an adapter to get the camera focused. Some 
refractors are designed to be used with diagonal mirrors and thus need a longer focal length 
when used with camera.
To achieve that, simply attach an extender to the focuser of your telescope and then attach the 
camera with a T-adapter to the extender. 

Camera adapter

The magnification produced by a telescope is determined by the focal length of the eyepiece 
that is used with it. To determine a magnification for your telescope, divide its focal length by 
the focal length of the eyepieces you are going to use. For example, a 10 mm eyepiece will give 
80x magnification with an 800 mm telescope.

Choosing the appropriate eyepiece

Extender

T

-

adapter

Camera

Focuser

Eyepiece

 

holder

Focusing

 


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Magnification = Focal length of the telescope / Focal length of the eyepiece 

e.g. 800mm / 10mm = 80x

When you are observing astronomical objects, you are looking through a column of air that 
reaches to the edge of space and that column seldom stays still. Similarly, when viewing over 
land you are often looking through heat waves radiating from the ground, houses, buildings, etc. 
Your telescope may yield very high magnifications, but what you end up magnifying is all the 
turbulence between the telescope and the object. A good rule of thumb is that practical 
magnification of a telescope is about 2x per 1 mm of aperture under good conditions. Higher 
magnifications will significantly reduce the quality of the image.

The area that you see through your telescope is called the true (or actual) field of view and is 
determined by the optical design of the eyepiece. Every eyepiece has a value, called the 
apparent field of view, which is supplied by the manufacturer. Field of view is usually measured 
in degrees and/or arc-minutes (1 deg. equals 60 arc-minutes). The true field of view produced by 
your telescope is calculated by dividing the apparent field of view of an eyepiece by the 
magnification that you have just calculated for the combination. For example, if your 10 mm 
eyepiece has an apparent field of view of 52 degrees, then the true field of view is 0.65 degrees 
or 39 arc-minutes.

True Field of View = Apparent Field of View / Magnification

e.g. 52° / 80X = 0.65°

To put this in perspective, the Moon is about 0.5° or 30 arc-minutes in diameter, so this 
combination would be fine for viewing the whole moon with a little room to spare. Remember, 
too much magnification and too small a field of view can make it very hard to find things. It is 
usually best to start at a lower magnification with its wider FOV and then increase the 
magnification when you have found what you are looking for. First find the Moon then look at the 
shadows in the craters.

The exit pupil is the diameter of the narrowest point of the cone of light leaving your telescope. 
Knowing this value for a telescope-eyepiece combination tells you whether your eye is receiving 
all of the light gathered by the primary lens. The average person has a fully dilated pupil 
diameter of about 7 mm. This value varies a bit from person to person, is less until your eyes 
become fully dark adapted and decreases as you get older. To determine an exit pupil, you have 
to divide the aperture of your telescope by the magnification.

Formula: Exit Pupil = Aperture in mm / Magnification

For example, a 200 mm telescope with an 8 mm eyepiece produces a magnification of 25x and an 
exit pupil of 8mm. This combination can probably be used by a younger person but would not be 
of much value to a senior citizen. The same telescope used with a 6 mm eyepiece gives a 
magnification of about 33x and an exit pupil of 6 mm, which should be fine for most dark 
adapted eyes.

Field of view

Exit pupil

 


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Sky conditions are usually defined by two atmospheric characteristics, seeing, or the steadiness 
of the air, and transparency, light scattering due to the amount of water vapor and particles in 
the air. When you observe the Moon or planets, and they appear as though water is running over 
them, you probably have bad "seeing" because you are observing through turbulent air. In 
conditions of good seeing, the stars appear steady, without twinkling. Ideal transparency is when 
the sky is inky black and the air is unpolluted

Observations

Travel to the best site that is reasonably accessible. It should be away from city lights, and 
upwind from any source of air pollution. Always choose as high an elevation as possible; this will 
get you above some of the lights and pollution and will ensure that you aren't in any ground fog. 
Sometimes low fog helps by blocking light pollution if you get above it. Try to have an 
unobstructed view of the horizon, especially the southern horizon if you are in the Northern 
Hemisphere and vice versa. Remember that the darkest sky is usually at the zenith, directly 
above your head. Do not try to observe anything that passes near hills or buildings along its 
route. Even extremely light winds can cause major air turbulence as they flow over the top of a 
building or a wall. When observing from a pavement, your steps may cause slight tremors and 
vibrations of the telescope. Pavements may also be exuding heat stored throughout the day, 
which will also decrease the quality of your views. Observing through a window is not 
recommended because the window glass will distort images considerably. And an open window 
can be even worse, since warmer indoor air will escape out the window, causing turbulence 
which also affects images. All in all, astronomy is an outdoor activity. These telescope models 
need at least 10 minutes in the open to adapt to the outside temperatures. 

Choosing the right time for observations

The best conditions will have still air, and obviously, a clear view of the sky. Some clouds may be 
present, as often broken clouds provide excellent seeing. Do not view immediately after sunset. 
After the sun goes down, the ground is still cooling, causing air turbulence. As the night goes on, 
not only will the seeing improve, but air pollution and ground lights will often diminish as well. 
The best time for observations is early morning. Objects are best observed as they cross the 
meridian, which is an imaginary line that runs through the Zenith, due North-South. This is the 
point at which objects reach their highest points in the sky, and negative atmospheric effects are 
reduced to their minimum.

Eye adaptation

Try to avoid any electric lights for 30 minutes prior to observing. This allows your pupils to dilate 
to their maximum diameter. To avoid fatigue, observe with both eyes open. It is recommended to 
cover the eye you are not using with your hand or an eye patch. Use peripheral vision on dim 
objects, as the center of your eye is the least sensitive to low light levels. When viewing a dim 
object, don't look directly at it. Instead, look slightly to the side, and the object will appear 
brighter.

Weather conditions

 


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Optical design

Aperture

Focal length

Highest practical power

Limiting stellar magnitude

Resolution threshold

Eyepiece

Finderscope

Mount

Tripod

refractor
80mm
400mm; f/5
160x
11.6
1.5 arcsec
1.25"; SUPER10 & SUPER25
6x30
AZ3
aluminum; 700-1250mm

Maintenance

Replace the dust cap over the front end of the telescope whenever it is not in use. This prevents 
dust from settling on the lens. Be careful when cleaning optics and try not to damage the coating. 
Use only special cleaning wipes. 

Optical design

Aperture

Focal length

Highest practical power

Limiting stellar magnitude

Resolution threshold

Eyepiece

Mount

Tripod

refractor
76mm
700mm; f/9.2
152x
11.9
1.82 arcsec
1.25"; SUPER10 & SUPER25
AZ1
aluminum

Levenhuk 

Skyline 80х400 AZ 

Levenhuk 

Skyline 7

6

х700 AZ

Optical design

Aperture

Focal length

Highest practical power

Limiting stellar magnitude

Resolution threshold

Eyepiece

Finderscope

Mount

Tripod

refractor
70mm
700mm; f/10
140x
11.3
1.71 arcsec
1.25"; SUPER10 & SUPER25
6x34
AZ2
aluminum; 650-1200mm

Levenhuk 

Skyline 70х700 AZ

Maintenance

Specifications

 


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Warranty

The Vendor guarantees that the quality of the Levenhuk product purchased complies with the 
technical documentation requirements on conditions that the consumer observes rules of 
transportation, storage conditions and operating instructions. 

Levenhuk Ltd. warrants the product against defects in materials.

During the warranty period the Buyer can return the defect product to the Vendor or to Levenhuk 
service center. Levenhuk Ltd. will repair or replace the defect product at its own discretion.
No claims are accepted in case the properly filled warranty slip is absent or contains corrections, 
or if the defect product has not been provided by the Buyer. The manufacturer or the seller is not 
liable for any damages caused by misuse of the product. No guarantee is provided in cases the 
product was used for purposes other than that intended or has mechanical damages, scratches, 
cracks, optics damages, as well as in cases the product is broken-down due to impact damages, 
squeezing or stretching or the product has been disassembled or repaired by unauthorized 
personnel.

This warranty does not cover components and/or accessories with limited use period, batteries, 
etc. 

The period of warranty is 3 (three) years beginning on the date of purchase. Please keep the 
warranty slip along with your receipt.

For more details on the after-sales service please contact Levenhuk.
www.levenhuk.com

Purchase date ___________________________

Signature __________________________ 

Stamp

Optical design

Aperture

Focal length

Highest practical power

Limiting stellar magnitude

Resolution threshold

Eyepiece

Finderscope

refractor
102mm
1000mm; f/9.8
204x
12.1
refractor
102mm
1000mm; f/9.8
204x12.1

Levenhuk 

Skyline 102х1000 AZ

 


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Planisphere

 Levenhuk M20 / Levenhuk M12

If you cannot fall asleep at night, seeing the starry sky outside, and visions of not so distant 
universe trouble your mind at times, we have just the thing for you. The Planisphere will help you 
determine the current position of stars in the sky on any given day and at any time. The star 
chart shows stars of up to third apparent magnitude of the northern celestial hemisphere and a 
part of the southern celestial hemisphere.

 


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Levenhuk Space Posters

Ever wondered what is the size of the Sun? How many expeditions there were to the Moon? What 
will happen to the Sun in 8 billion years? Levenhuk® Space posters answer these and many other 
questions. Each poster provides you with visual and nicely arranged blocks of trivia on planets, 
stars and satellites proportions, as well as weight, age, composition and formation history of each 
star.

 


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Levenhuk Accessories

Levenhuk optics cleaning tools

Developed and manufactured for Levenhuk, Ltd. Long Island City, NY 11101 USA.
Levenhuk® is a registered trademark of Levenhuk,
Ltd. Copyright © 2006-2012 Levenhuk Ltd. All rights reserved

The Levenhuk series of cleaning tools is all you need to keep your optics 
clean and durable and to maintain its excellent quality.