PDF User Manual

  1. Home
  2. Manuals
  3. LFO expander LFO User Manual

LFO expander LFO User Manual

Made by: LFO expander
Type: User Manual
Category: Extender
Pages: 11
Size: 0.30 MB

 

Download PDF User Manual



Full Text Searchable PDF User Manual



background image

 
 
 

rev 1, 08-2010 

 
Thank you for choosing the LFO-expander to expand the possibilities of your 
synthesizer. 
 

Connections 

All connections are made on the right side. For your convenience, the main out is 
presented as a standard jack (6,3mm) and minijack (3,5 mm) output. Please use 
only one of them. 
 
Picture 1: Right-side view 

 
 

1

 

Pedal-in or CV-in :jack 
6,3mm (TS or TRS) 

2

 

Main out: mini-jack (TS) 

3

 

Main out: jack (TS) 

4

 

CV-in: mini-jack (TS) 

5

 

CV-out: mini-jack (TS) 

6

 

DC input (12V DC) 

 
Note: 
TS 

= Tip – Sleeve 

TRS 

= Tip – Ring - Sleeve 

CV 

= Control Voltage 

 

Power Supply 

The LFO-expander runs on 2 9V batteries (not included) or on an external DC-power 
transformer (not included). When using a DC transformer, the batteries will be 
automatically disconnected. Use a 12V transformer, 250mA or more. GND on the 
outside, +12V on the center. Inverting the power will cause no harm. Connector 
type: ø6,3mm x ø2,1mm 
 

Foot pedal 

The foot pedal can be an active pedal (containing a battery itself) with TS-jack or the 
pedal can be a passive pedal (adjustable resistor) with TRS-jack. We recommend a 
moog EP2 expression pedal or any pedal with the same specifications. A resistance of 
50 k-Ohms works very well for the LFO-expander. 

 


background image

(Re)placing batteries 

 
Picture 2: battery-replacement 
 

 
Unscrew the 2 bolts as 
indicated in picture 2. Place 
2 9V batteries inside the 
battery-clamps and connect 
each of them to one of the 
leads. Be careful: don’t pull 
the leads. When replacing 
the battery-cover make 
sure both batteries fit inside 
the hole of the housing. 
Tighten the 2 screws. 
 
When no batteries are 
installed, connect both 
connectors inside each 
other so their metal parts 
won’t cause short-circuit 
inside the unit. 

 
When batteries are running low of power, LFO frequency will decrease and the unit 
will perform not as it should be. 

 


background image

General description 
 

The LFO-expander generates an LFO-signal, a sweep signal and can be used to 
attenuate a CV-signal. The LFO-signal and sweep-signal can be modulated by a foot-
pedal, Control Voltage (say from a modular synth), or by hand. 
 
All connections are made on the right side of the LFO-expander. Thanks to that, the 
expander can be placed just above the keyboard of a minimoog or ARP2600. 
 

LFO 

The LFO-circuit generates a rectangular or triangle shaped signal that can be used to 
modulate pitch (vibrato), filter (wah-wah), amplitude (tremolo) or other destinations 
on your synth, depending on the possibilities of your synth. 
The LFO has an adjustable depth and speed that can be set with the controls on the 
top-panel. 
When applying a signal to the PEDAL IN / CV IN input, or by manually turning the 
MANUAL knob, both the speed and depth of the LFO signal can be influenced at the 
same time (!) at independent levels. 
 

Sweep 

The sweep-circuit generates a positive or negative voltage, depending on the 
position of its control-knob. This voltage can be influenced by a signal coming from 
the PEDAL IN / CV IN input or by manually turning the MANUAL knob. 
The range of the sweep-voltage can be selected and you can mix it with the LFO-
signal. 
 

Additional CV 

The additional CV-function makes it possible to connect any synth that has CV-in and 
CV-out jacks (for controlling the pitch of the synthesizer’s oscillators), and add a 
real-time controllable LFO or bend to that synthesizer.  
Inside the LFO-expander there’s a trimmer to adjust the amount of key-CV when the 
switch is in “mix” mode. Before shipping the unit this trimmer was set to a 1:1 ratio 
while the unit was connected to an ARP2600. If your synth’s pitch doesn’t track 1:1 
when it’s key-CV is processed by the LFO-expander you’ll have to open the LFO-
expander by unscrewing all 7 knobs (allan key), remove the 4 screws that hold the 
housing and adjust the trimmer with a small screwdriver for a 1:1 ratio. 
 
The additional CV-circuit is also handy to process a CV from your modular synth with 
a knob that’s just in front of you. Set the switch to the right to activate this function. 
 
 
 

 


background image

Description of controls 

 
Picture 3: description of controls 

 
 

1

 

power-switch. Led above switch will light when on. 

2

 

speed range switch. Switches from low-speed to high speed. LED above 
switch will flash indicating LFO-speed. 

3

 

Waveform switch. Switches between rectangular and triangle wave shape 
for LFO signal. 

4

 

Initial depth of LFO. This knob controls the portion of the depth of the LFO 
that will not be influenced by the signal from the pedal-in jack or manual 
knob (12). 

5

 

Controllable depth of LFO. This knob determines how much effect the 
signal from the pedal-in jack or manual button has on the depth of the 
LFO. 

6

 

Initial speed of LFO. This knob controls the portion of the speed of the LFO 
that will not be influenced by the signal from the pedal-in jack or manual 
knob (12). 

7

 

Controllable speed of LFO. This knob determines how much effect the 
signal from the pedal-in jack or manual button has on the speed of the 
LFO. 

8

 

Sweep. This knob controls the amount of CV that will be generated when 
you control the foot-pedal or manual button (12). The CV can be negative 
(counter clockwise) or positive (clockwise). 

9

 

This button changes the output of the sweep. Usually, set to low for pitch-
control, set to high for filter-control. 

10

 

Sweep-mix. When turned off, the sweep CV will not be fed to the main 
out. When set to mix the sweep-CV will be added to the LFO-signal. 

11

 

Manual/pedal switch. This switch determines whether the manual-knob 
(12) or foot-pedal will control the LFO and sweep signals. 

12

 

Manual knob. When button 11 is set to “manual”, this knob controls the 
controllable portion of the LFO-depth and speed and controls the sweep-
signal. 

13

 

CV-mix. This button determines whether a signal applied to the CV-in will 
be routed to the CV-knob (14) or will be mixed 1:1 with the LFO- and 
Sweep signals. 

14

 

CV knob. This knobs controls the attenuation of the CV-signal when button 
13 is set to right. The CV-signal will then be routed to the independent CV 
out. 

 

 


background image

Connection examples 

 
The next diagrams offer some examples for connecting the LFO-expander to 
synthesizers. In general, the LFO-expander can be used on almost every analog 
synthesizer having CV IN and CV OUT. In general, the CV-IN jack of a synthesizer is 
internally connected to it’s CV OUT. By inserting a jack into the CV IN, this internal 
connection will be broken. Now, when you feed the synths’s CV OUT to the LFO-
expander, it will come back to the synth including the LFO or sweep (bend) signals. 
 
On many synthesizers, the CV IN is routed to the filter-circuit as well (just like the 
synth’s internal keyboard CV is) so the filter cut-off frequency is influenced by the 
output of the LFO-expander as well. On some synths, this key tracking can be set on 
or off. 
 
Some additional information: 
 

On the Moog model D minimoog, there is no CV out. However, there is 
an “OSC IN” jack. External signals routed to this “OSC IN” jack are 
mixed with the minimoog’s own keyboard CV. 
 
On the Yamaha CS80, external signals are reversed in polarity. So set 
the sweep-knob to the left (negative side) to bend the pitch higher or 
the filter brighter.  
 
On the Yamaha CS50 and CS60, direct currents are filtered out from 
the external signal. This means pitch bending and very slow LFO’s 
applied to the CS50 or CS60 will lead to unexpected results. Normal 
LFO-frequencies will not be a problem. 

 
 
 
Example 1: Vibrato on model D minimoog. 
 
Connect the foot pedal and 
minimoog as shown in the 
diagram. Set the controls as 
shown. Play the keyboard of the 
minimoog and use the foot pedal to 
control LFO speed and depth. 

 


background image

Example 2: Vibrato on monosynth with CV-in / CV-out 
 
Connect the foot pedal as shown. 
Connect the synth’s KEY CV OUT to 
the CV IN of the LFO-expander. 
Connect the main OUT to the 
synth’s CV IN. Play the keyboard of 
your synth and use the foot pedal 
to control LFO speed and depth. 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
Example 3: Pitch-bends on monosynth with CV-in / CV-out 
 
 
Connections are like 
example 2. Turn the LFO-
controls fully counter 
clockwise and set SWEEP 
switch to “mix”. The SWEEP 
knob and RANGE switch can 
be set to determine the 
range of the sweep. 
Remember, the SWEEP 
knob can be set to positive 
(upward) or negative 
(downward) bends. 
 
Note: 
Make the connections as 
shown in example 1 and set 
the controls as shown over 
here to make pitch bends 
on the minimoog. 
 
 
 
 

 


background image

Example 4: Filter cut-off frequency control on ARP 2600 
 

 
 
Connect patch 
cords as shown. 
Use invert output 
of voltage 
processor 1 and 
move that slider 
fully to the right. 
Play the keyboard 
of the ARP 2600 
and turn the CV-
knob to create 
filter sweeps. 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 

 
 
Example 5: ARP2600 filter cut-off controlled by passive foot pedal 

 
 
Connect patch 
cords as shown. 
Play the keyboard 
of the ARP 2600 
and use the 
passive foot pedal 
to sweep the filter 
cut-off frequency. 
 
Or: 
 
Switch to “manual” 
and use the 
“manual” knob 
instead of the foot 
pedal 

 


background image

Example 6: Variable filter cut-off keyboard tracking on ARP 2600 

 
 
 
Connect patch 
cords as shown. 
Play the keyboard 
of the ARP 2600 
and turn the CV-
knob to control the 
amount of filter  
keyboard tracking. 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 

 
 
Example 7:  LFO speed keyboard-tracking on ARP 2600 
 
 

 
Connect patch cords 
as shown. Do not 
use oscillators KYBD 
CV but one of the 
other osc inputs. 
Play the keyboard of 
the ARP 2600 and 
notice LFO speed will 
increase when 
playing higher keys. 
 
Note: use the 2600’s 
multiples to control 2 
or 3 oscillators at the 
same time. 
 
 
 
 
 

 

 


background image

Example 8:  Vibrato on Yamaha CS80 
 
Connect the foot pedal as shown. Connect LFO-expander’s main out to “external in” 
of CS80. Set “external level” halfway. Set CS80’s Sub Oscillator function to “EXT.” 
and adjust VCO slider as shown in detail. Use the foot pedal to control vibrato. 
Now, you can apply vibrato (and change it’s speed) by foot-pedal while 
independently applying other effects (such as VCF-control) by using the keyboards 
poly-aftertouch. Besides the action of the foot pedal, poly aftertouch can still control 
the depth for the modulation of vco’s, filter and amplification. 
You can also use the “SWEEP” function to make pitch bends or filtersweeps. 
Since the CS80’s internal LFO (named sub oscillator) is disconnected from the 
internal signal source (because the function-lever is set to “ext”), the two “speed” 
levers just above the keyboard are not functioning anymore. However, the “touch 
control” levers for brilliance and level on both voice-channels ( and memory-banks) 
are still active and can be used to create effects with poly-aftertouch. 
 
Note: 
the range of vibrato and pitch bends is limited by the CS80. Maximum is about 3 to 4 
semitones up and down. When applying higher levels to the CS, the signal will be 
clipped, resulting in strange, unnatural (but interesting) waveforms. 
 
Note: 
the signal applied to the “EXTERNAL IN” of the CS80 is inverted. Set the SWEEP-
knob on the LFO-expander to negative values to create upward bends while pressing 
the foot pedal.  
 
Note: 
on the CS50 and CS60, pitch bends will not work correctly because constant–level or 
slow changing signals are filtered by the CS50 and CS60. 

 


background image

Example 9: Real-time pitch-transposing of sequence 
 
In this example, the LFO-expander’s functionality to mix 2 CV’s is demonstrated. By 
adding a keyboard CV to a sequencer CV, real-time transposing of the sequence is 
possible by pressing keys on the keyboard while the sequencer is running. In this 
example, the synth’s keyboard CV OUT is routed to the LFO-expander’s 1:1 CV 
circuit. De sequencer’s CV OUT is connected to the LFO-expander’s PEDAL IN / CV IN 
and routed to the SWEEP-circuit. Now, carefully adjust the SWEEP-knob to obtain a 
1:1 amplification of the sequencer’s CV out (set SWEEP RANGE to “high”). 
Connect the main OUT of the LFO-expander to the CV IN of your synthesizer. 
Connect the GATE OUT of the sequencer to the GATE IN of your synthesizer. 
 

 
 
 
Note: 
You can set the 
LFO-controls to 
add vibrato to the 
sequence and 
free the internal 
LFO of your synth 
for other 
purposes. 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 

 


background image

other ideas 

 
 
ARP2600: 
Use the LFO-expander’s triangle wave to modulate osc2 Pulse Width (PWM). 
Use the EXTERNAL VIBRATO IN on your 3620 keyboard to apply LFO or pitch bends 
to all oscillators. 
Use a passive foot pedal to control any input on your 2600 (by using the sweep 
function). 
 
(semi) modular synthesizer: 
Use the output of an envelope to shape the amplitude and speed of the LFO. 
Reverse the output of an envelope via the negative sweep function. 
 
Minimoog: 
You can now use oscillator 3 as a sound source and use the LFO-expander for 
modulations (pitch, filter, volume). 
 
Passive foot pedal: 
If you own a passive foot-pedal (like most pedals are) but your equipment demands 
an active pedal (a pedal that creates a voltage) you can use the LFO-expander to 
convert your passive pedal into an active pedal (by using the sweep-function). 
 
Midi: 
Use a midi to CV converter to control LFO speed and depth over midi. 
 
General: 
Use the LFO-expander as a second LFO source. For example, use the LFO expander 
as shown in example 2 for vibrato and use the synth’s internal LFO for filter 
modulation (wah-wah) or auto-key-triggering. 
 
 
 
 
 
For latest info, please visit 

www.lfo-expander.com