PDF User Manual

  1. Home
  2. Manuals
  3. Gentex GN-503 SERIES Installation Instructions Manual

Gentex GN-503 SERIES Installation Instructions Manual

GN-503 GN-503F

Made by: Gentex
Type: Installation Instructions
Category: Carbon Monoxide Alarm
Pages: 12
Size: 0.33 MB

 

Download PDF User Manual


Related Product Video

 

Full Text Searchable PDF User Manual



background image

PHOTOELECTRIC TYPE

SINGLE/MULTIPLE STATION

SMOKE ALARM, AC POWERED,

WITH BATTERY BACK-UP &

TANDEM WIRE CONNECTION

AND ELECTROCHEMICAL

CARBON MONOXIDE ALARM

GN-503 SERIES

COMBINATION

PHOTOELECTRIC SMOKE

& CARBON MONOXIDE (CO)

ALARM

LIMITED WARRANTY

For a period of 12 months from the date of purchase, or a maximum of 18 months from the

date of manufacture, Gentex warrants to you, the original consumer purchaser, that your

smoke/CO Alarm will be free from defects in workmanship, materials, and construction under

normal use and service. The CO sensor has a limited warranty period of 5 years from date of

installation.If a defect in workmanship, materials, or construction should cause your smoke/CO

Alarm to become inoperable within the warranty period, Gentex will repair your smoke/CO

Alarm or furnish you with a new or rebuilt replacement smoke/CO Alarm without charge to you

except for postage required to return the smoke/CO Alarm to us. Your repaired or

replacement smoke/CO Alarm will be returned to you free of charge and it will be covered

under this warranty for the balance of the warranty period.

This warranty is void if our inspection of your smoke/CO Alarm shows that the damage or

failure was caused by abuse, misuse, abnormal usage, faulty installation, improper

maintenance, or repairs other than those performed by us.

ANY WARRANTIES IMPLIED UNDER ANY STATE LAW, INCLUDING IMPLIED

WARRANTIES OF MERCHANTABILITY OR FITNESS FOR A PARTICULAR PURPOSE,

APPLY ONLY FOR THE WARRANTY PERIOD SPECIFIED ABOVE. PLEASE NOTE THAT

SOME STATES DO NOT ALLOW LIMITATIONS ON HOW LONG AN IMPLIED WARRANTY

LASTS, SO THE ABOVE EXCLUSION MAY NOT APPLY TO YOU.

GENTEX WILL NOT BE LIABLE FOR ANY LOSS, DAMAGE, INCIDENTAL OR

CONSEQUENTIAL DAMAGES OF ANY KIND ARISING IN CONNECTION WITH THE SALE,

USE, OR REPAIR OF THIS SMOKE/CO ALARM. PLEASE NOTE THAT SOME STATES DO

NOT ALLOW THE EXCLUSION OR LIMITATION OF INCIDENTAL OR CONSEQUENTIAL

DAMAGES. SO THE ABOVE EXCLUSION MAY NOT APPLY TO YOU.

If a defect in workmanship, materials, or construction should cause your Smoke/CO Alarm

to become inoperable within the warranty period, you must return the smoke/CO Alarm to

Gentex postage prepaid. You must also pack the smoke/CO Alarm to minimize the risk of it

being damaged in transit. You must also enclose a return address. smoke/CO Alarms

returned for warranty service should be sent to: Gentex Corporation, 10985 Chicago Drive,

Zeeland, MI 49464.

If we receive a smoke/CO Alarm in a damaged condition as the result of shipping, we will

notify you and you must file a claim with the Shipper.

THIS LIMITED WARRANTY GIVES YOU SPECIFIC LEGAL RIGHTS. YOU MAY ALSO

HAVE OTHER RIGHTS WHICH VARY FROM STATE TO STATE.

GENTEX CORPORATION

10985 CHICAGO DRIVE,

ZEELAND, MI 49464

PHONE: 1-800-436-8391

www.gentex.com

550-0496-A

Important Notice:
These materials have been prepared by Gentex Corporation ("Gentex") for informational purposes only, are necessarily summary, and are not purported to serve as legal advice and should not be used as such. Gentex makes no rep-

resentations and warranties, express or implied, that these materials are complete and accurate, up-to-date, or in compliance with all relevant local, state and federal laws, regulations and rules. The materials do not address all legal

considerations as there is inevitable uncertainty regarding interpretation of laws, regulations and rules and the application of such laws, regulations and rules to particular fact patterns. Each person's activities can differently affect the

obligations that exist under applicable laws, regulations or rules. Therefore, these materials should be used only for informational purposes and should not be used as a substitute for seeking professional legal advice. Gentex will not

be responsible for any action or failure to act in reliance upon the information contained in this material.

 


background image

PHOTOELECTRIC TYPE SINGLE/MULTIPLE STATION SMOKE ALARM,

AC POWERED, WITH BATTERY BACK-UP & TANDEM WIRE CONNECTION

AND ELECTROCHEMICAL CARBON MONOXIDE ALARM

Installation Instructions - Owner's/User’s Information Manual -READ CAREFULLY AND SAVE

INTRODUCTION GN-503 SERIES

The GN-503 Series combination photoelectric smoke alarm and

electrochemical carbon monoxide (CO) alarm for use as an

evacuation device in all dwelling units. The device has a solid state

piezo signal to warn and alert the household to the presence of

threatening smoke and carbon monoxide.

Your combination smoke/CO alarm is designed to detect the

smoke that results from an actual fire or carbon monoxide gas.

Consequently, it is uncommon for household smoke such as

cigarette smoke or normal cooking smoke to cause an alarm.

BASIC SAFETY INFORMATION

Dangers, Warnings, Cautions and Notices alert you to important

operating procedures or to potentially hazardous situations. Pay

special attention to these items.
WARNING!

 This combination photoelectric smoke/CO alarm is listed for use in

single-family and multi-family residences, along with hotels, motels

and other commercial residential occupancies.

 This CO alarm will only indicate the presence of increased levels

of carbon monoxide gas at the sensor. Increased levels of carbon

monoxide gas may be present in other areas.

 This combination smoke/CO alarm must receive continuous

120VAC, 60Hz , pure sine wave electrical power. (battery is meant

for emergency back-up only). In order for the emergency battery

back-up to work, a new battery must be properly installed (see

BATTERY INSTALLATION section).

 NEVER ignore your combination smoke/CO alarm if it sounds.

Refer to IF YOUR SMOKE/CO ALARM SOUNDS section for more

information. Failure to do so can result in serious injury or death.

 Test this device once a week. If the device ever fails to test

correctly, replace immediately! If the device is not working

properly, it can not alert you to a problem.

 This product is intended for use in indoor locations of family

dwelling units. It is not designed to measure CO levels in

compliance with Occupational Safety and Health Administration

(OSHA) commercial or industrial standards. Individuals with

medical conditions that may make them more sensitive to carbon

monoxide may consider using warning devices which provide

audible and visual signals for carbon monoxide concentrations

under 30 ppm. For additional information on carbon monoxide and

your medical condition, contact your physician.

MODELS

(SEE BACK OF SMOKE/CO ALARM FOR EXACT MODEL)

*GN-503..........................120VAC, 60Hz with temporal horn

* These units produce a temporal audible alarm for smoke alarm

notification. Per NFPA 72, the American National Standard Audible

Emergency Evacuation Signal as defined in ANSI S3.41, is required

whenever the intended response is to evacuate the building.

OPTIONS

F - 1 Form A/1 Form C Auxiliary Relay

ELECTRICAL SPECIFICATIONS

OPERATING VOLTAGE. . . . . . . . . 120VAC, 60Hz

OPERATING CURRENT. . . . . . . . . 0.045 amps

OPERATING AMBIENT

TEMPERATURE RANGE . . . . . . . 40

O

F to 100

O

F

ALARM HORN RATING. . . . . . . . . 85dBA at 10 feet
NOTICE: In the event AC Power fails, a 9VDC battery will provide

proper alarm operation for a minimum of 24 hours.

GN-503 SERIES

COMBINATION PHOTOELECTRIC
SMOKE & CARBON MONOXIDE (CO) ALARM

Under normal conditions, the light generated by the pulsing

infrared LED is not seen by the light sensor, as it is positioned out of

the direct path of the light beam. When smoke enters the sensing

chamber, light from the pulsing LED light source is reflected by the

smoke particles onto the photodiode light sensor. At the first sighting

of smoke, the device is put into a pre-alarm mode. This is indicated

by a rapidly flashing red LED on the face of the smoke/CO alarm.

Once the light sensor confirms smoke for 2 consecutive pulses

inside the chamber, the light sensor produces the signal necessary

to trigger the device and sound the electronic horn.

GENERAL INFORMATION - CARBON MONOXIDE ALARM

NOTICE: CO problems can occur at any time.

When fully powered, the device samples the air and takes a new

reading about every 30 seconds. A microchip inside the unit stores

each reading and remembers the levels of CO it has been exposed

to over time. The CO portion of the smoke/CO alarm will sound

when it has been exposed to a critical level of CO (measured in

parts per million or ppm) within a specified time (measured in

minutes). This CO alarm features a permanently installed sensor, an

indicator light and an 85dBA, temporal 4 alarm horn. It also has a

reset feature to temporarily quiet the alarm horn. If critical levels of

CO remain, the alarm will re-activate and sound.
NOTICE: MALFUNCTION WARNING This unit performs a self-

diagnostic test. If the alarm malfunctions it should be replaced

immediately. See IF THE CO ALARM IS NOT OPERATING

PROPERLY for more information.

HOW TO TELL IF THE SMOKE/CO ALARM IS

WORKING PROPERLY

 Your device is provided with an alarm horn and flashing red Light

Emitting Diode (LED) indicator, which flashes every 15-30

seconds, and a green AC power on LED and red LED for CO.

 Test button function: when test button is pressed, the full operation

of the light source, light sensor and CO sensor circuit are verified

and will initiate an alarm.

550-0496

Pg. 5-2

HOW THE SMOKE/CO ALARM WORKS

GENERAL INFORMATION - SMOKE ALARM

The GN-503 Series alarm operates on the photoelectric light

scatter principle for the smoke sensor and electrochemical sensing

principal for the CO sensor. The device’s sensing chamber houses

a light source and a light sensor.

For smoke detection, the darkened sensing chamber is exposed

to the atmosphere and designed to permit optimum smoke entry

from any direction while rejecting light from outside the smoke/CO

alarm.

The light source is an infrared (invisible) LED which pulses every

30 seconds to detect smoke. The light sensor is a photodiode

matched to the light frequency of the LED light source.

 


background image

g. Meet at your prearranged meeting place after leaving the house.

h. Call the Fire Department as soon as possible from outside your

house. Give the address and your name.

i. Never re-enter a burning building.

Contact your local Fire Department for more information on

making your home safer from fires and about preparing your family's

escape plans.

NOTE: Current studies have shown smoke/CO

alarms may not awaken all sleeping individuals,

and that it is the responsibility of individuals in the

household that are capable of assisting others to

provide assistance to those who may not be awak-

ened by the alarm sound, or to those who may be

incapable of safely evacuating the area unassisted.
WHAT THIS SMOKE/CO ALARM CAN DO

This smoke/CO alarm is designed to sense smoke entering its

sensing chamber. It does not sense heat or flames.

When properly located, installed, and maintained, this smoke/CO

alarm is designed to provide early warning of developing fires at a

reasonable cost. This device monitors the air and, when it senses

smoke, activates its built-in alarm horn. It can provide precious time

for you and your family to escape from your residence before a fire

spreads. Such an early warning, however, is possible only if the

smoke/CO alarm is located, installed, and maintained as specified in

this User's Manual.

This smoke/CO alarm is designed for use within single residential

living units only; that is, it should be used inside a single-family home

or one apartment of a multi-family building. In a multi-family building,

the device may not provide early warning for residents if it is placed

outside of the residential units, such as on outside porches, in

corridors, lobbies, basements, or in other apartments. In multi-family

buildings, each residential unit should have smoke/CO alarms to

alert the residents of that unit. Devices designed to be

interconnected should be interconnected within one family residence

only; otherwise, nuisance alarms will occur when a smoke/CO alarm

in another living unit is tested.

NOTICE: WHAT SMOKE/CO ALARMS CANNOT DO

Smoke/CO alarms will not work without power. A battery

must be connected to the device to maintain proper operation if AC

power supply is cut off by an electrical fire, an open fuse or

circuit breaker, or for any other reason. In the event of AC power

failure, the battery will supply power for a minimum of 24 hours.

Smoke/CO alarms may not sense fire that starts where

smoke cannot reach the units such as in chimneys, in walls, on

roofs, or on the other side of closed doors. If bedroom doors are

usually closed at night, smoke/CO alarms should be placed in each

bedroom as well as in the common hallway between them.

Smoke/CO alarms also may not sense a fire on another level

of a residence or building. For example, a second-floor device

may not sense a first-floor or basement fire. Therefore, smoke

alarms should be placed on every level of a residence or

building.

The horn in your device meets or exceeds current audibility

requirements of Underwriters Laboratories. However, if the

smoke/CO alarm is located outside a bedroom, it may not wake

up a sound sleeper, especially if the bedroom door is closed or only

partly open. If the device is located on a different level of the

residence than the bedroom, it is even less likely to awaken people

sleeping in the bedroom. In such cases, the National Fire Protection

Association recommends that the smoke/CO alarms be

interconnected so that a unit on any level of the residence will sound

an alarm loud enough to awaken sleepers in closed bedrooms. This

can be done by employing a systematic approach by interconnecting

smoke/CO alarms together, or by using radio frequency transmitters

and receivers.

All types of smoke/CO alarm sensors have limitations. No

type of device can sense every kind of fire every time. These

types of fires include:

1) Fires where the victim is intimate with a flaming initiated fire;

for example, when a person’s clothes catch on fire while

cooking.

2) Fires where the smoke is prevented from reaching the

smoke/CO alarm due to a closed door or other obstruction.

3) Incendiary fires where the fire grows so rapidly that an

occupant’s egress is blocked even with properly located

smoke/CO alarms.

550-0496

Pg. 5-3

 If the battery is low or missing, a chirp will be emitted. If the

smoke/CO alarm is malfunctioning, two chirps will sound. If AC

power fails, the green LED will turn off. Reference Troubleshooting

Guide on page 5-9.

NOTE: Tandem Interconnected Devices.

 When testing one device, the device that is activated will flash the

red indicator light and sound its alarm horn. All other units will

sound the alarm horn with their red indicator lights remaining off.

FIRE PROTECTION PLAN: WHAT YOU CAN DO TO

MAKE YOUR FAMILY SAFE FROM FIRES

This smoke/CO alarm can quickly alert you to the presence of

smoke - it cannot prevent fire. The ultimate responsibility for fire

protection rests solely on you.

Installing smoke/CO alarms is just the first step in protecting your

family from fires. You also must reduce the chances that fires will

start in your home and increase your chances of safely escaping if

one does start. To have an effective fire safety program:

a. Install smoke/CO alarms properly following the instructions

in this manual. Keep your units clean. Test your smoke

alarm weekly and maintain or replace it when it no longer

functions. As with any electronic product, smoke/CO alarms

have a limited life, it is recommended that smoke/CO alarms be

replaced when end of life signal sounds. Smoke/CO alarms that

don't work cannot protect you.

b. Follow safety rules and prevent hazardous situations:

 Use smoking materials properly; never smoke in bed.

 Keep matches and cigarette lighters away from children.

 Store flammable materials in proper containers and never use

them near open flames or sparks.

 Keep electrical appliances and cords in good working order and

do not overload electrical circuits.

 Keep stoves, fireplaces, chimneys, and barbecue grills grease-

free and make sure they are properly installed away from

combustible materials.

 Keep portable heaters and open flames such as candles away

from combustible materials.

 Do not allow rubbish to accumulate.

 Do not leave small children home alone.

c. Develop a family escape plan and practice it with your

entire family, especially small children.

 Draw and post a floor plan of your home and find two ways to

exit from each room. There should be one way to get out of

each bedroom without opening the door.

 Teach children what the smoke/CO alarm signal means, and

that they must be prepared to leave the residence by

themselves if necessary. Show them how to check to see if

doors are hot before opening them, how to stay close to the

floor and crawl if necessary, and how to use the alternate exit if

the door is hot and should not be opened.

 Decide on a meeting place a safe distance from your house and

make sure that all your children understand that they should go

and wait for you if there is a fire.

 Hold fire drills at least every 6 months to make sure that

everyone, even small children, know what to do to escape

safely.

 Know where to go to call the fire department from outside your

residence.

 Provide emergency equipment such as fire extinguishers and

teach your family to use this equipment properly.

d. Bedroom doors should be closed while sleeping if a

smoke/CO alarm is installed in the bedroom. They act as a

barrier against heat and smoke.

WHAT TO DO IF THERE IS A FIRE IN YOUR HOME

If you have prepared family escape plans and practiced them with

your family, you have increased their chances of escaping safely.

Review the following rules with your children when you have fire

drills so everyone will remember them in a real fire emergency. If

alarm should sound:

a. Don't panic; stay calm. Your safe escape may depend on thinking

clearly and remembering what you have practiced.

b. Get out of the house following a planned escape route as quickly

as possible. Do not stop to collect anything or to get dressed.

c. Open doors carefully only after feeling to see if they are hot. Do

not open a door if it is hot; use an alternate escape route.

d. Stay close to the floor; smoke and hot gases rise.

e. Cover your nose and mouth with a cloth, wet if possible, and take

short, shallow breaths.

f. Keep doors and windows closed unless you open them to escape.

 


background image

In general, smoke/CO alarms may not always warn you

about fires caused by violent explosions, escaping gas,

improper storage of flammable materials, or arson.

NOTICE: This smoke/CO alarm is not designed to replace special-

purpose fire detection and alarm systems necessary to protect

persons and property in non-residential buildings such as

warehouses, or other large industrial or commercial buildings. It

alone is not a suitable substitute for complete fire-detection systems

designed to protect individuals in hotels and motels, dormitories,

hospitals, or other health and supervisory care and retirement

homes. Please refer to NFPA 101,The Life Safety Code, and NFPA

72 for smoke alarm requirements for fire protection in buildings not

defined as "households."

Installing smoke/CO alarms may make you eligible for lower

insurance rates, but smoke/CO alarms are not a substitute for

insurance. Home owners and renters should continue to insure

their lives and property.

NOTICE: GENERAL LIMITATIONS OF SMOKE/CO

ALARMS

This smoke/CO alarm is intended for all dwelling units. It is not

intended for use in industrial applications where Occupational Safety

and Health Administration (OSHA) requirements for carbon monox-

ide detectors must be met.

Smoke/CO alarms may not awaken all individuals. If children

and others do not readily awaken to the sound of the smoke/CO

alarm or if there are infants or family members with mobility

limitations, make sure that someone is assigned to assist them in the

event of an emergency.

Smoke/CO alarms will not work without power. This

smoke/CO alarm requires a continuous supply of power.

Smoke/CO alarms for solar or wind energy users and battery

back-up power systems: AC powered smoke/CO alarms should

only be operated with true or pure sine wave inverters. Operating

this device with most battery powered UPS (uninterruptible power

supply) products or square wave or “quasi sine wave” inverters will

damage the alarm. If you are not sure about your inverter or UPS

type, please consult with the manufacturer to verify.

This smoke/CO alarm will not sense carbon monoxide that

does not reach the sensor. This device will only sense CO at the

sensor. CO may be present in other areas. Doors or other obstruc-

tions may affect the rate at which CO reaches the alarm. For this

reason, if sleeping room doors are usually closed at night, we

recommend you install an alarm in each sleeping room and in the

hallway of each sleeping area.

Smoke/CO alarms may not sense CO on another level of the

residence. For example, an alarm on the second floor, near the

bedrooms may not sense CO in the basement. For complete

coverage, it is recommended that an alarm be installed on each

level.

Smoke/CO alarms may not be heard. The alarm decibel rating

meets or exceeds current UL Standards of 85dBA at 10 feet (3

meters). However if the device is installed outside the sleeping area,

it may not awaken a sound sleeper, one who has recently used

drugs or has been drinking alcoholic beverages. This is especially

true if the door is closed or only partially open. Even persons who

are awake may not hear the sounding alarm if the sound is blocked

by distance or closed doors. Noise from traffic, stereo, radio,

television, air conditioner, or other appliances may also prevent alert

persons from hearing the alarm horn. This device is not intended for

people who are hearing impaired.

Smoke/CO alarms are not a substitute for life insurance.

Though these devices warn against increasing CO levels, Gentex

Corporation does not warrant or imply in any way that they will

protect lives from CO poisoning. Homeowners and renters must still

insure their lives.

Smoke/CO alarms have a limited life. Although the device and

all of its components have passed many stringent tests and are

designed to be as reliable as possible, any of these parts could fail

at any time. Therefore, you must test your smoke/CO alarm weekly.

Smoke/CO alarms are not foolproof. Like all other electrical

devices, smoke/CO alarms have limitations. They can only detect

CO that reaches their sensors. They may not give early warning to

rising CO levels if the CO is coming from a remote part of the home,

away from the alarm. NOTICE: smoke/CO alarms may not alarm

when a large influx of CO is introduced into the house. An example

of a possible source of a large in-rush of CO is a generator running

in an attached, enclosed garage and the door to the connected

residence is opened.

WHAT YOU NEED TO KNOW

ABOUT CO

WHAT IS CO? Carbon Monoxide (CO) is an invisible, odorless,

tasteless gas produced when fossil fuels do not burn completely or

are exposed to heat (usually fire). Electrical appliances typically do

not produce CO.
These fuels include: wood, coal, charcoal, oil, natural gas, gasoline,

kerosene and propane.

Common appliances are often sources of CO. If they are not

properly maintained, are improperly ventilated, or malfunction, CO

levels can rise quickly. CO is a real danger now that homes are

more energy efficient. “Air-tight” homes with added insulation,

sealed windows and other weatherproofing can ‘trap’ CO inside.

SYMPTOMS OF CO POISONING: These symptoms are related to

CO POISONING and should be discussed with ALL household

members.

Some individuals are more sensitive to CO than

others, including people with cardiac, respiratory or other

health problems, infants, young children, pregnant women and

elderly people can be more quickly and severely affected by

CO. People sensitive to CO should consult their doctors for

advice on taking additional precautions.
FINDING THE SOURCE OF CO AFTER AN ALARM

Carbon monoxide is an odorless, invisible gas, which often

makes it difficult to locate the source of CO after an alarm. A few

factors that can make it difficult to locate sources of CO include:

 House well ventilated before the investigator arrives.

 Problem caused by “backdrafting”.

 Transient CO problem caused by special circumstances.

Because CO may dissipate by the time an investigator arrives, it

may be difficult to locate the source of CO. Gentex Corporation

shall not be obligated to pay for any carbon monoxide (CO)

investigation or service call.
HOW CAN I PROTECT MY FAMILY?

A smoke/CO alarm is an excellent way of protection. It monitors

the air and sounds a loud alarm before carbon monoxide (CO) levels

become threatening for average, healthy adults.
NOTICE: A smoke/CO alarm is not a substitute for proper

maintenance of home appliances.
To help prevent CO problems and reduce the risk of CO poisoning:

 Clean chimneys and flues yearly. Keep them free of debris,

leaves, and nests for proper air flow. Also, have a professional

check for rust and corrosion, cracks or separations. These

conditions can prevent proper air movement and cause

backdrafting. Never cap or cover a chimney in any way, that

would block air flow.

 Test and maintain all fuel-burning equipment annually. Many local

gas or oil companies and HVAC companies offer appliance

inspections for a nominal fee.

 Make regular visual inspections of all fuel-burning appliances.

Check appliances for excessive rust and scaling. Also check the

flame on the burner and pilot lights. The flame should be blue. A

yellow flame means fuel is not being burned completely and CO

may be present. Keep the blower door on the furnace closed.

Use vents or fans when they are available on all fuel-burning

appliances. Make sure appliances are vented to the outside. Do

not grill or barbecue indoors, in garages or on screen porches.

 Check for exhaust backflow from CO sources. Check the draft

hood on an operating furnace for a backdraft. Look for cracks on

furnace heat exchangers.

 Check the house or garage on the other side of shared wall.

 Keep windows and doors open slightly. If you suspect that CO is

escaping into your home, open a window or door. Opening

windows or doors can significantly reduce CO levels.

EXPOSURE

SYMPTOMS OF CO POISONING

Mild

Slight headache, nausea, vomiting, fatigue

(flu-like symptoms)

Medium

Throbbing headache, drowsiness, confusion,

rapid heart rate

Extreme

Convulsions, unconsciousness, heart and lung

failure. Exposure to carbon monoxide (CO)

can cause brain damage and death

550-0496

Pg. 5-4

 


background image

550-0496

Pg. 5-5

Figure 3: A SMOKE/CO ALARM MUST BE LOCATED BETWEEN

THE SLEEPING AREA AND THE REST OF THE DWELLING UNIT

AS WELL AS IN EACH BEDROOM.

Where to Locate the Required Smoke Alarms. The major threat

from fire in a dwelling unit occurs at night when everyone is asleep.

Persons in sleeping areas can be threatened by fires in the

remainder of the unit; therefore, smoke/CO alarms are best located

in each bedroom and between the bedroom areas and the rest of the

unit as shown in Figure 3.

Figure 3

In dwelling units with more than one bedroom area or with

bedrooms on more than one floor, more than one smoke/CO alarm

is required, as shown in Figure 4.

11.5.1.2 Where the area addressed in 11.5.1.1(2) is separated from

the adjacent living areas by a door, a smoke alarm shall be installed

in the area between the door and the sleeping room, and additional

alarms shall be installed on the living area side of the door as

specified by 11.5.1.1 and 11.5.1.3.
11.5.1.3 In addition to the requirements of 11.5.1.1(1) through

11.5.1.1(3), where the interior floor area for a given level of a

dwelling unit, excluding garage areas, is greater than 93m

2

(1000ft

2)

,

smoke alarms shall be installed per 11.5.1.3.1 and 11.5.1.3.2.
11.5.1.3.1 All points on the ceiling shall have a smoke alarm within a

distance of 9.1m (30ft) travel distance or shall have an equivalent of

one smoke alarm per 46.5m

2

(500ft

2

) is evaluated by dividing the

total interior square footage of floor area per level by 46.5m

2

(500ft

2

).

11.5.1.3.2 Where dwelling units include great rooms or vaulted/

cathedral ceilings extending over multiple floors, smoke alarms

located on the upper floor that are intended to protect the

aforementioned area shall be permitted to be considered as part of

the lower floor(s) protection scheme used to meet the requirements

of 11.5.1.3.1.

The installation of additional alarms of either the smoke, heat or

CO type should result in a higher degree of protection. Adding

alarms to rooms that are normally closed off from the required

alarms increases the escape time because the fire does not need to

build to the higher level necessary to force smoke out of the closed

room to the required alarms. As a consequence, it is recommended

that the householder consider the installation of additional fire

protection devices. However, it should be understood that NFPA 72

does not require additional smoke/CO alarms over and above those

called for in Figures 2, 3, 4 and 5 where required smoke/CO alarms

are shown.

Figure 2: A SMOKE/CO ALARM MUST BE LOCATED ON EVERY

LEVEL OF DWELLING UNIT, INCLUDING BASEMENT, WITHIN

EACH SLEEPING ROOM AND OUTSIDE SLEEPING AREAS.

Figure 2

Transient CO Problems: transient or on-again-off-again CO

problems can be caused by outdoor conditions and other special

circumstances.

The following conditions can result in transient CO situations:

1) Excessive spillage or reverse venting of fuel appliances caused by

outdoor conditions such as:

 Wind direction and/or velocity, including high, gusty winds. Heavy

air in vent pipes (cold/humid air with extended periods between

cycles).

 Negative pressure differential resulting from the use of exhaust

fans.

 Several appliances running at the same time competing for limited

fresh air.

 Vent pipe connections vibrating loose from clothes dryers,

furnaces or water heaters.

 Obstructions in or unconventional vent pipe designs which can

amplify the above situations.

2) Extended operation of unvented fuel burning devices (range,

oven, fireplace)

3) Temperature inversions, which can trap exhaust close to the

ground.

4) Car idling in an open or closed garage or near a home.

5) Portable generator used in an open or closed garage or near a

home.

These conditions can come and go. They are also hard to

recreate during a CO investigation.

PLACEMENT OF SMOKE/CO ALARMS

THIS EQUIPMENT SHOULD BE INSTALLED IN ACCORDANCE

WITH THE NATIONAL FIRE PROTECTION ASSOCIATION'S

STANDARD 72 (National Fire Protection Association, Batterymarch

Park, Quincy, MA 02269).

For your information, the National Fire Protection Association's

Standard 72, reads as follows:

NFPA 72, 2007 Edition, Chapter 11, Section 11.5.1 Required

Detection, states the following:

11.5.1.1 Where required by applicable laws, codes or standards for a

specific type of occupancy, approved single and multiple-station

smoke/CO alarms shall be installed as follows:

1) In all sleeping rooms and guest rooms

2) Outside of each separate dwelling unit sleeping area, within 6.4m

(21ft) of any door to a sleeping room, the distance measured

along a path of travel

3) On every level of a dwelling unit, including basements

4) On every level of a residential board and care occupancy (small

facility), including basements and excluding crawl spaces and

unfinished attics

5) In the living area(s) of a guest suite

6) In the living area(s) of a residential board and care occupancy

(small facility)

POTENTIAL SOURCES OF CO IN RESIDENTIAL

DWELLINGS

Fuel-burning appliances like: portable heater, gas or wood burning

fireplace, gas kitchen range or cooktop, gas clothes dryer, portable

generators.

Damaged or insufficient venting: corroded or disconnected water

heater vent pipe, leaking chimney pipe or flue, or cracked heat

exchanger, blocked or clogged chimney opening.

Improper use of appliance/device: operating a barbecue grill,

portable generator or vehicle in an enclosed area (like a garage or

screened porch), or even your home.

Figure 1

Figure 1:

POTENTIAL SOURCES OF CO IN HOME.

Figure 4: IN DWELLING UNITS WITH MORE THAN ONE

SLEEPING AREA, A SMOKE/CO ALARM MUST BE PROVIDED TO

PROTECT EACH SLEEPING AREA IN ADDITION TO SMOKE/CO

ALARMS REQUIRED IN BEDROOMS.

Figure 4

 


background image

550-0496

Pg. 5-6

IMPORTANT CONSIDERATION

NFPA states the following for replacement of smoke/CO

alarms: NFPA 720, 2009 Edition, Chapter 8, Section 8.10.2 states:

Smoke/CO alarms shall be replaced when either the end-of-life

signal is activated or the manufacturer’s replacement date is

reached. Alarms shall also be replaced with they fail to respond to

operability tests.

Smoke/CO alarms should be replaced when end of life signal

sounds, why:

 Dust, dirt, and other environmental contaminants can affect your

smoke alarm over a prolonged period.

 Fast changing industry consensus standards and codes on all

smoke alarms make it advisable to periodically upgrade your

smoke alarm to maximize life safety.

 Assurance that your smoke alarm needs are kept abreast with the

constantly improving electronic technology.

 Smoke alarms are recognized as one of the lowest cost ways to

protect dwelling inhabitants against the danger of fire(s). It makes

good common sense to periodically replace and update your

smoke alarm that contributes so much to life safety.

MOUNTING LOCATION

This smoke/CO alarm can be mounted on a ceiling or wall with equal

efficiency in either location.

 Ceiling location smoke/CO alarm should be mounted as close as

possible to the center of a hallway or room. If this is not possible,

the edge of the smoke/CO alarm should be at least 4 inches from

any wall.

 Wall location locate the top of the smoke/CO alarm at least 4

inches and not more than 12 inches from the ceiling.

Figure 6: RECOMMENDED SMOKE/CO ALARM MOUNTING

LOCATIONS

Figures 1, 2, 3, & 4 are reprinted with permission from NFPA 72, National Fire Alarm

Code®, Copyright ©2002, National Fire Protection Association, Quincy, MA 02169. This

reprinted material is not the complete and official position of the National Fire Protection

Association on the referenced subject which is represented only by the standard in its

entirety. National Fire Alarm Code® and NFPA 72® are registered trademarks of the

National Fire Protection Association, Inc., Quincy, MA 02169.

Figure 6

Figure 7: RECOMMENDED SMOKE/CO ALARM LOCATION IN

ROOMS WITH SLOPED, GABLED, OR PEAKED CEILINGS.
The placement of the smoke/CO alarm is critical if maximum speed

of fire detection is desired. Thus, a logical location for a smoke

alarm is the center of the ceiling. At this location, the device is

closest to all areas of the room.

WHERE ALARMS SHOULD BE INSTALLED IN

MOBILE HOMES

In mobile homes built after about 1978 that were designed and

insulated to be energy-efficient, smoke/CO alarms should be

installed as described in the section above.

In older mobile homes that have little or no insulation compared

to today's standards, uninsulated metal outside walls and roofs can

transfer heat and cold from outdoors, making the air right next to

them hotter or colder than the rest of the inside air. These layers of

hotter or colder air can prevent smoke from reaching a smoke/CO

alarm. Therefore, install devices in such units only on inside walls,

between 4 and 12 inches (10 and 30 cm) from the ceiling. If you are

not sure about the insulation level in your mobile home, or if you

notice that the walls or ceiling are unusually hot or cold, install the

device on an inside wall.

Minimum protection requires one smoke/CO alarm as close to

the sleeping area as possible. For better protection, install one

device in each room, but first read the "Locations to Avoid."

Figure 7

Figure 8

LOCATIONS TO AVOID

Nuisance alarms are caused by placing smoke/CO alarms where

they will not operate properly. To avoid nuisance alarms, do not

place smoke/CO alarms:

 In or near areas where combustion particles are normally

present such as kitchens; in garages where there are particles

of combustion in vehicle exhausts; near furnaces, hot water

heaters, or gas space heaters. Install smoke/CO alarms at least

20 feet (6 meters) away from kitchens and other areas where

combustion particles are normally present.

 In air streams passing by kitchens. Figure 8 shows how a

smoke/CO alarm can be exposed to combustion particles in

normal air movement paths, and how to correct this situation.

Figure 5: A SMOKE/CO ALARM MUST BE LOCATED ON EACH

LEVEL IN ADDITION TO EACH BEDROOM.

Figure 5

In addition to smoke/CO alarms outside of the sleeping areas

and in each bedroom, NFPA 72 requires the installation of a smoke

alarm on each additional level of the dwelling unit, including the

basement. These installations are shown in Figure 5. The living

area smoke/CO alarm should be installed in the living room or near

the stairway to the upper lever, or in both locations. The basement

smoke/CO alarm should be installed in close proximity to the

stairway leading to the floor above. Where installed on an open-

joisted ceiling, the smoke/CO alarm should be placed on the bottom

of the joists. The smoke/CO alarm should be positioned relative to

the stairway so as to intercept smoke coming from a fire in the

basement before the smoke enters the stairway.

 In damp or very humid areas, or next to bathrooms with

showers. The moisture in humid air can enter the sensing

chamber as water vapor, then cool and condense into droplets

that cause a nuisance alarm. Install smoke/CO alarms at least

10 feet (3 meters) away from bathrooms.

 In very cold or very hot environments, or in unheated

buildings or outdoor rooms, where the temperature can go

below or above the operating range of the smoke alarm.

Temperature limits for proper operation are 40° to 100°F (4.4° to

37.8°C).

 In very dusty or dirty areas. Dust and dirt can build up on the

smoke alarm's sensing chamber and can make it overly sensitive,

or block openings to the sensing chamber and keep the smoke

alarm from sensing smoke.

 Near fresh air inlets, returns or excessively drafty areas. Air

conditioners, heaters, fans, fresh air intakes and returns can drive

smoke away from smoke/CO alarms, making the devices less

effective.

 In dead air spaces at the top of a peaked roof or in the

corners between ceilings and walls. Dead air may prevent

 


background image

IMPORTANT SAFETY MESSAGES

 This smoke/CO alarm is designed for use inside a single or

multi-family dwelling. It is not meant to be used in common

lobbies, hallways, or basements of multi-family buildings

unless working alarms are also installed in each family living

unit. Smoke/CO alarms in common areas may not be heard

from inside individual family living units.

 This smoke/CO alarm is not a suitable substitute for complete

detection systems in places which house many people like

hotels or dormitories, unless a smoke/CO alarm is also placed

in each unit.

 DO NOT use this smoke/CO alarm in warehouses, industrial or

commercial buildings, special-purpose non-residential

buildings or airplanes. This smoke/CO alarm is specifically

designed for residential use and may not provide adequate

protection in non-residential applications.

Never disconnect an AC CO alarm to silence a

nuisance alarm. Open a window or fan the air around the CO alarm.

The alarm will automatically turn off when the CO in the air is

completely gone. Do not stand close to the CO alarm. The sound

produced by the CO alarm is loud because it is designed to awaken

you in an emergency. Prolonged exposure to the horn at a close

distance may be harmful to your hearing.

MOUNTING OUTLET BOX

Use a 2" x 3" switch box or a 4" square or octagon junction box.

Mount a box for each smoke/CO alarm. If wall mounting is desired,

be sure the box screws are oriented to upper right and lower left

corners. Be sure to use supplied Mounting Plate.

WIRING ONE ALARM

1. Run a minimum of 16 gauge, 2-conductor cable, plus ground (3

wires) to the junction box from a power supply. Smoke/CO alarms

shall be connected to their own dedicated circuit. Use UL Listed

Class 1 wire.

NOTE: The wiring to be used shall be in accordance with the

provisions of Article 300.3(b) 210 of the National

Electrical Code, ANSI/NFPA 70 as well as Article 210.

2. Make wire connections to the supplied plug-in connector as

follows: black to black, white to white, and connect the ground

wire to the metal outlet box.

WIRING TWO OR MORE ALARMS

Tandem Installation

NOTE: All smoke/CO alarms in a tandem installation must be

controlled by the same fuse or circuit breaker. Otherwise tandem

units will not operate. Tandem will operate in the event of AC power

failure if battery is connected to the smoke alarm.

LIMITATIONS: A maximum of 12 smoke/CO alarms (GN-503)

may be connected together. Do not exceed 125 feet between each

device. Do not exceed 1125 feet between first and last smoke/CO

alarm.

INSTALLATION GN-503 SERIES

NOTICE: New Construction: DO NOT attach smoke/CO alarm head

until AFTER sanding, painting, and other dust creating situations are

finished and cleaned up.

WIRING/GENERAL

1. Use U.L. Listed cable with Class 1 insulation.

2. Observe local code requirements. Use box connector to anchor

cable to outlet box.

3. Metal outlet boxes must be grounded to earth ground.

4. NOTICE: Use only Duracell MN 1604 battery with the GN-503

Series smoke/CO alarms. Available at many retail stores.

550-0496

Pg. 5-7

smoke from reaching a smoke alarm. See Figures 6 and 7 for

recommended mounting locations.

 In insect-infested areas. If insects enter a smoke/CO alarm's

sensing chamber, they may cause a nuisance alarm. Get rid of

the bugs before installing smoke/CO alarms where bugs are a

problem.

 Near fluorescent light fixtures. Electrical "noise" from nearby

fluorescent light fixtures may cause a nuisance alarm. Install

smoke/CO alarms and fluorescent lights on separate electrical

circuits.

Never disconnect an AC smoke/CO alarm to silence

a nuisance alarm. Open a window or fan the air around the device

to remove the smoke. The alarm will automatically turn off when the

smoke in the air is completely gone. Do not stand close to the

device. The sound produced by the smoke alarm is loud because it

is designed to awaken you in an emergency. Prolonged exposure to

the horn at a close distance may be harmful to your hearing.

WHERE SMOKE/CO ALARMS SHOULD NOT BE

INSTALLED

DO NOT INSTALL THIS CO ALARM:

 In garages, kitchens, furnace rooms, or in any extremely dusty,

dirty or greasy areas.

 Closer than 15 feet (4.6 meters) from a furnace or other fuel

burning heat source or fuel burning appliance like a water heater.

 Within 5 feet (1.5 meters) of any cooking appliance

 Near any type of diaper pails or receptacle.

 Near animal litter boxes, cages or kennels.

 In extremely humid areas. This alarm should be at least 10 feet (3

meters) from a bath or shower, sauna, humidifier, vaporizer, dish

washer, laundry room, utility room or other source of high humidity.

 In areas where temperature is colder than 40°F (4°C) or hotter

than 100°F (38°C). These areas include non-air conditioned crawl

spaces, unfinished attics, uninsulated or poorly insulated ceilings,

porches and garages.

 In turbulent air, like near ceiling fans, heat vents, air conditioners,

fresh air returns, or open windows. Blowing air may prevent CO

from reaching the sensors.

 In direct sunlight

 In outlets covered by curtains or other obstruction.

Turn off electricity to prevent SHOCK and damage to

smoke/CO alarm. Be sure the power line to the smoke/CO alarm is

not controlled by any on/off switch, or other type of switch, other than

a fuse or circuit breaker.

NOTICE: Ensure that all fluorescent lighting fixtures are properly

grounded.

NOTE: The wiring to be used shall be in accordance with the provi-

sions of Article 210 of the National Electrical Code, ANSI/NFPA 70.

Wire installation should be performed only by a licensed electrician.

Figure 10

NOTE: RED-YELLOW WIRE AND BROWN-YELLOW WIRE: The

red-yellow wire and brown-yellow wire from the smoke/CO alarm is

for tandem connection only. DO NOT USE, AND DO NOT REMOVE

INSULATION CAP UNLESS CONNECTING ANOTHER CO ALARM,

SMOKE/CO ALARM OR SMOKE ALARM.

Figure 9

RED-YELLOW OR

BROWN-YELLOW WIRE

UNINSULATED WIRE

EARTH GROUND -

FOR METAL BOXES

ONLY

3-WIRE CABLE

AND GROUND

120VAC

BLACK

WHITE

 Use brown/yellow wire to tandem interconnect GN-503 Series

alarms to additional GN-503 Series and CO1209 Series.

 DO NOT USE RED/YELLOW TO INTERCONNECT GN-503

SERIES AND CO1209 SERIES. If the red/yellow is used to

interconnect the GN-503 Series to additional GN-503 Series and

CO1209 Series, the units will not be tandem interconnected. The

brown/yellow MUST be used.

 


background image

MOUNTING: PLATE & SMOKE/CO ALARM

1. Lace the connector through the provided mounting plate and

secure the plate to the junction box.

2. Plug the wire connector into the smoke/CO alarm base.

NOTES ON TANDEM INTERCONNECTING MODELS

 DO NOT connect Gentex Smoke Alarms to other manufacturers'

smoke alarms.

 A maximum of 18 compatible smoke, heat,

CO and/or combination smoke/CO alarms may be interconnected.

No more than 12 of the 18 can be smoke alarms per NFPA72

 No more than 12 Gentex model GN-503 or GN-503F may be

connected in tandem.

 No more than 6 Gentex LEGACY products with Form A/Form C

contacts may be connected in tandem.

 All units connected in tandem MUST get their power from the

same circuit, that is, all smoke alarms in tandem must be

controlled by the same fuse or circuit breaker.

 After installation, to verify proper working conditions, all horns must

sound in this system.

 When tandem interconnecting GN-503 Series to additional GN-503

Series or CO1209 Series and the smoke alarm horn sounds but

are not synchronized and the CO horn does not sound the

red/yellow wire has been used. Use brown/yellow wire.

3. Place device up to mounting plate, rotating it clockwise until

device firmly snap locks into place. Keep smoke alarm parallel to

the mounting plate so tabs on plate seat correctly into device.

4. Remove dust-cover after all construction is complete. Dust-

cover must be removed prior to power being supplied to the

smoke/CO alarm. If the dust-cover is not removed, operation of

smoke/CO alarm will be inhibited.

NOTE: Remove dust-cover before operating smoke/CO alarm

Figure 11

RED-YELLOW

BROWN-YELLOW WIRE

4

th

UNINSULATED

WIRE EARTH

GROUND - FOR

METAL BOXES ONLY

4-WIRE CABLE

120VAC

BLACK

WHITE

Figure 12

Figure 13

POWER ON

INDICATOR/

SMOKE

INDICATOR

Figure 14

CO INDICATOR

550-0496

Pg. 5-8

1. Run a minimum of 16 gauge, 3-conductor cable, plus ground (4

wires) to the first junction box from a power supply and between

all smoke/CO alarms that are to be connected together. Use UL

Listed Class 1 wire. Power limited cable for multiple tandem

connections are available at many commercial electrical retail

stores.

NOTE: When using both tandem connections, 4-conductor

cable, plus ground (5 wires) will be used.

2. Make wire connections to the supplied plug-in connector as

follows: black to black, white to white, 3rd conductor to the

red/yellow wire for legacy Gentex products or the brown/yellow

wire for new . The red/yellow wire or brown/yellow wire should be

stripped to make the connection. Connect ground wire between

metal outlet boxes.

Figure 11

LIMITATIONS:

Maximum of 12

smoke/CO alarms

may be connected

together. Do not

exceed 125 feet

between each

smoke/CO alarm.

Do not exceed

1125 feet between

the first and last

smoke/CO alarm.

 Use red/yellow wire to tandem interconnect GN-503 alarms to

Gentex legacy products. Legacy products include 9120/9123

Series, 7100/7103 Series, 710CS/713CS Series, 7109CS/7139CS

Series, GN-200/GN-203 Series and GN-300/GN-303 Series.

 Use brown/yellow wire to tandem interconnect GN-503 Series

alarms to additional GN-503 Series and CO1209 Series.

 If the red/yellow wire is used to interconnect the GN-503 Series to

additional GN-503 Series and CO1209 Series, the units will not be

tandem interconnected. The brown/yellow MUST be used.

 Do not tandem using both the red/yellow wire and brown/yellow

wire. Only 1 tandem interconnect wire is needed between units.

CAUTION: Failure to observe any of the conditions set forth may

cause system malfunction and damage to the device.

BATTERY INSTALLATION

1. Locate side mounted battery drawer.

2. Open battery drawer by firmly pulling on side lip, then sliding

battery drawer open.

3. Insert battery into drawer, terminal side first. Take care to make

sure the appropriate terminal is aligned correctly, (+) terminal on

battery to (+) terminal on alarm metal contact and (-) terminal on

battery to (-) terminal on the alarm metal contact.

4. Rotate battery into drawer and close drawer. Note: the battery

drawer will not close if the battery is installed incorrectly.

5. Slide battery drawer shut until it is snapped into place.

6. Use only Duracell MN 1604 battery with the GN-503 Series

smoke/CO alarm. Available at many retail stores.

7. Push test button to verify battery operation.

NOTE: Units with battery back-up will not provide power or transmit

an alarm to other AC only units in the event of an AC power failure.

All battery back-up units in tandem with good batteries will operate

normally during an AC power failure a minimum of 24 hours

.

PUSH BUTTON

FOR SELF TEST.

PUSH BUTTON

AND HOLD UNTIL

DEVICE ALARMS

FOR

FUNCTIONAL

TEST

NOTE: A maximum of 12 smoke/CO alarms of GN-503 with the

relay option (F) may be tandem interconnected.

Wire used for interconnection shall be in accordance with article

760 of the latest edition of National Electrical Code (NFPA 70) and

must not exceed a resistance of 10 ohms.

5. Press and release button for self test feature. Results of test:

 Alarm is silent - Smoke/CO Alarm is in good working condition

 


background image

Alarms have various limitations. See “General Limitations of

smoke/CO Alarms” for details.

3. Immediately move to fresh air - outdoors or by an open door or

window. Meet at prearranged meeting place after leaving the

house. Verify all persons are accounted for. Do not re-enter

premises or move away from the fresh air until the emergency

responder has arrived, the premise has been aired out and the

smoke/CO alarm remains in normal condition.

4. After following steps 1-3, if the smoke/CO alarm reactivates within

a 24-hour period, repeat steps 1-3 and call a qualified appliance

technician to investigate for sources of CO from fuel-burning

equipment and appliances as well as inspect for proper operation

of this equipment. If problems are identified during this inspection,

have the equipment serviced immediately. Note any combustion

equipment not inspected by the technician and consult the

manufacturers’ instructions, or contact the manufacturers directly

for more information about CO safety and this equipment. Make

sure that motor vehicles are not and have not been operating in an

attached garage or adjacent to the residence. Write down the

number of a qualified appliance technician here:

“ALARM - MOVE TO FRESH AIR”

If you hear the smoke/CO alarm horn and the red light is flashing,

move everyone to a source of fresh air. DO NOT unplug the alarm!

 NEVER remove the battery from your alarm to silence the

horn; use the reset feature. Removing the battery, removes

your protection! See “If Your smoke/CO Alarm Sounds” for

details on responding to an alarm.

The reset feature is intended to reset the CO alarm while the

problem is corrected - IT WILL NOT CORRECT A CO PROBLEM.

While the alarm has been reset, the device will continue to monitor

the air for the presence of CO.

When CO reaches alarm levels, the alarm will sound a temporal

4 horn pattern - 4 beeps, a pause, 4 beeps, a pause, etc. Press the

reset button until the horn becomes silent. The initial reset cycle will

last approximately 5 minutes.

NOTE: After initial 5 minute reset cycle, the alarm will re-evaluate

present CO levels and respond accordingly. If CO levels remain

potentially dangerous, or increase to higher levels, the alarm will

sound again.
While the alarm is silenced:

If the smoke/CO alarm:

This means:

Is silent for only 5 minutes,

CO levels are still

then the alarm sounds again

potentially dangerous

If the smoke/CO alarm:

This means:

Remains silent after the reset

CO levels are dropping

button has been pressed

TROUBLESHOOTING GUIDE

PROBLEM:

THIS MEANS:

ACTION TAKEN:

Smoke/CO alarm goes

back into alarm 5

minutes after the reset

button was pressed.

CO levels indicate

a potentially

dangerous situation.

IF YOU ARE

FEELING SYMPTOMS

OF CO POISONING,

EVACUATE your home

and call 911 or the Fire

Department. If not,

press the reset button

again and keep

ventilating your

home.

Green light is OFF. Red

light is not flashing.

Unit will not go into test

mode when reset

button is pressed.

Device may not be

receiving power.
NO AC and no

battery in device

Contact licensed

electrical technician for

equipment inspection

service, immediately.

Alarm sounds 2 quick

chirps every 30

seconds.

Device has become

dirty or defective.

Clean (refer to

Maintenance Section)

or warranty return.

Alarm sounds 3 quick

chirps every 30

seconds.

END OF LIFE

SIGNAL. Device

needs to be

replaced.

Contact Gentex

Corporation for

replacement

information.

Green light is ON and

red light is not flashing

and alarm chirps once

every 30 seconds

Low or no battery in

device
AC is powering

device

Replace battery (refer

to Battery Installation

Section) or return to

manufacturer

Reset button is

pressed. LED’s do not

flash and device does

not go into test mode.

Device is not

operating properly.

Contact Gentex

Corporation for

replacement

information.

Only CO portion of

device is operating.

Smoke portion of

device is not

operating properly.

Contact Gentex

Corporation for

replacement

information.

Any questions that are not answered within this manual, call Gentex

Corporation at 1-800-436-8391.

550-0496

Pg. 5-9

IF YOUR SMOKE/CO ALARM SOUNDS

Actuation of the smoke/CO alarm (temporal 4 tone) indicates the

presence of carbon monoxide (CO) which can kill you. If the

device alarm sounds, do not ignore the unit!
IF THE ALARM SIGNAL SOUNDS:

1. Operate the Test/Reset button. While the alarm has been reset,

the device will continue to monitor the air for the presence of CO.

If the alarm sounds again after 5 minutes there are CO levels that

are potentially dangerous.

2. Call emergency services, fire department or 911. Write the

number of your local emergency service here:

CHECKOUT & TROUBLESHOOTING

1. Supply house power to the smoke/CO alarm, green indicator

will be on. The red indicator light should flash approximately

every 15-30 seconds, showing that unit is operating properly.

2. If red light is not flashing or the green LED is not on:

a. Check that AC power is working.

b. Check that the battery is installed.

c. Push test button. Alarm will go into self test mode.

d. Check the connector plug and wire connections. NOTE: Be

sure you turn off power before checking wire connections.

e. If the power supply and wiring check out, but the red light does

not flash or the green LED is still off, return the unit to the

manufacturer. See TO RETURN AN ALARM.

3. When powering up devices in a tandem installation and all

the alarms sound immediately, inspect all devices for a solid

green LED. Verify wiring of units, if wiring checks and problem

remains, the devices with flashing red LED are the trouble units

and should be replaced.

4. If smoke/CO alarm becomes contaminated by excessive dust and

can not be cleaned, avoid nuisance alarms by replacing device.

USING THE RESET FEATURE

 The reset feature is for your convenience only and will not

correct a CO problem. ALWAYS check your home for a

potential problem after any alarm. Failure to do so can result

in injury or death.

 1 Chirp - Low battery. Replace battery following instructions in

Battery Installation Section

 2 Chirps - Smoke/CO Alarm has become dirty or defective or

there is a large influx of CO. Clean (refer to Maintenance

Section) or warranty return.

 3 Chirps - Smoke/CO Alarm is at end of life and must be replaced.

 


background image

WARNING! Smoke/CO alarms are designed to alarm before there is

an immediate life threat. Since CO gas can not be seen or smelled,

never assume it is not present.

 An exposure to 100 ppm of CO for 20 minutes may not affect a 

healthy adult, after 4 hours of exposure at the same level may 

cause headache.

 An exposure to 400 ppm of CO may cause headaches in a healthy 

adult after 35 minutes and could cause death after 2 hours.

NOTICE: This device measures exposure to CO over time.  This

device alarms if CO levels reach a certain minimum over an 

extended amount of time.  The device will go into alarm before the

onset of symptoms in healthy adults.  It is important to have early

notification of a potential hazard, while still having the ability to react

in time.  In many reported cases of CO exposure, victims may be 

aware that they were not feeling well, but became disoriented and

could no longer react well enough to exit the building or get help.

NOTE: Healthy adults may not experience any symptoms of CO

exposure when the device alarms, however infants, young children,

pregnant women, elderly people, people with cardiac, respiratory or

other health related issues may be more quickly and severely 

affected by CO exposure.  If even mild symptoms of CO poisoning,

consult a medical professional immediately.    

Standards: Underwriters Laboratories, Inc.  Single and Multiple

Station carbon monoxide alarms UL 2034.  For your information, the

UL 2034 Standard, reads as follows:

Underwriters Laboratories, Inc UL 2034, Section 1-1.2 Carbon

monoxide alarms covered by these requirements are intended to

respond to the presence of carbon monoxide from sources such as,

but not limited to, exhaust from internal-combustion engines, abnor-

mal operation from fuel-fired appliances and fireplaces.  CO alarms

are intended to alarm at carbon monoxide levels below those that

could cause a loss of ability to react to the dangers of carbon

monoxide exposure.

This alarm monitors the air at the device and is designed to

alarm before CO levels become life threatening.  This allows 

precious time to leave the house and correct the problem.  This is

only possible if the devices are properly located, installed and 

maintained as described in this manual.

Gas Detection at Typical Temperature and Humidity Ranges:

This device is not formulated to detect CO levels below 30 ppm 

typically.  UL tested for false alarm resistance to Methane (500 ppm),

Butane (300 ppm), Heptane (500 ppm), Ethyl Acetate (200 ppm),

Isopropyl Alcohol (200 ppm) and Carbon Dioxide (5000 ppm).

Values measure gas and vapor concentrations in parts per million.
Audible Alarm: 85dBA minimum at 10 feet (3 meters).

TO RETURN AN ALARM

Should you experience problems with your smoke/CO alarm, 

proceed as follows:

1. Turn off electrical power to the smoke/CO alarm.

2. Twist the smoke/CO alarm counter-clockwise to remove it from its 

mounting plate.  

3. Unplug the connector from the back of the smoke/CO alarm.  Do 

not remove the wire connection; leave the connector for your 

replacement smoke/CO alarm.  

4. Remove battery from smoke/CO alarm.  Do not ship smoke/CO   

alarm with battery still in battery drawer.  

5. Carefully pack (the manufacturer cannot be responsible for 

consequential damage) and return to the manufacturer.  Include 

complete details as to exact nature of difficulties being 

experienced and date of installation.

6. Return to:  Gentex Corporation, 10985 Chicago Drive, Zeeland, 

Michigan  49464.  Prior to returning, call Gentex at 800-436-8391 

or e-mail FP_RMA@gentex.com to obtain a RMA Number from 

our return department.

NOTICE: Do not cover, tape, or otherwise block the openings of your

smoke/CO alarm.  These openings are designed to allow air to pass

through your smoke/CO alarm, thus sampling the air around the

smoke/CO alarm.

NOTICE: Smoke/CO alarms are not to be used with detector

guards unless the combination has been evaluated by a 

nationally recognized testing laboratory and found suitable for

that purpose.

FAILURE TO REGULARLY CLEAN THIS SMOKE/CO ALARM

WILL RESULT IN FALSE ALARMS.  A BUILD UP OF DUST 

CREATES AN OBSCURATION THAT SIMULATES SMOKE.  THIS

MEANS THE UNIT WILL GO INTO ALARM WITHOUT A FIRE 

CONDITION.
WEEKLY TESTING

Press the test/reset button on the alarm until the alarm sounds.

During testing the device will simulate a smoke condition in the

alarm followed by an electrical test of the CO sensor.  LED’s will

flash to indicate testing.

The alarm sequence should last 10-20 seconds.  If the device

does not alarm, make sure it is fully operational.  If the device still

does not go into alarm mode when tested, replace the device 

immediately.

 If the alarm ever fails to test properly, replace it immediately.  

Products under warranty may be returned to the manufacturer 

for replacement, see “Limited Warranty.”

 DO NOT stand close to the device when the alarm is sound-

ing.  Exposure at close range could result in hearing damage.

 Never use exhaust from vehicle to test CO portion of alarm.  

Exhaust may cause permanent damage to alarm and voids the 

warranty.

TO KEEP THE ALARM WORKING PROPERLY:

 Test weekly as described in “Weekly Testing.”

 Keep alarm cover clean using soft cloth.  DO NOT vacuum or use 

compressed air, water, cleaners or solvents to clean alarm.

 Replace battery immediately if low battery warning is heard.  See 

“Battery Installation” section.

NOTICE: DO NOT spray cleaning chemicals or insect sprays

directly on or near the alarm.  DO NOT paint over the alarm.

Doing so may cause permanent damage.  

 Household cleaners, aerosol chemicals and other contaminants 

can affect the sensor.  When using any of these materials near the 

alarm, make sure the room is well ventilated.

 The CO alarm is not washable.  DO NOT submerge the alarm in 

water.  Water can affect the sensor, causing permanent damage.

 If your home is being fumigated, disconnect unit 

temporarily from wire harness and store where it will not be 

exposed to chemicals or fumes.  When fumigation is complete 

and all traces of fumes clear, re-connect unit back to wire 

harness and push the reset button.

UNDERWRITERS LABORATORIES, INC. UL 2034

WHAT LEVELS OF CO CAUSE AN ALARM

UL Standard UL 2034 requires residential smoke/CO alarms to

sound when exposed to levels of CO and exposure times as

described below.  CO levels are measured in part per million (ppm)

of CO over time (in minutes).

Pg. 5-10

1

Approximately 10% COHb exposure at levels of 10% to 95% 

Relative Humidity (RH).

550-0496-A 

08-01-08

MAINTENANCE

DO NOT open smoke/CO alarm for cleaning.  IF SMOKE/CO

ALARM IS OPENED, PRODUCT WARRANTY BECOMES VOID.
CAUTION: 
If the device does not work properly, do not try and fix it

yourself.  This will void your warranty.  See "To Return a Smoke/CO

Alarm" for instructions to return smoke alarms that do not operate

properly.  DO NOT TRY TO FIX IT YOURSELF.  

Gentex recommends CO alarms be tested a minimum of once a

week.  The test feature of your CO alarm accurately simulates CO

conditions and tests the CO alarm's functions as required by

Underwriters Laboratories.

CAUTION: Never use an open flame of any kind to test your device.

You may ignite and damage the smoke/CO alarm as well as your

home.  The test feature of your smoke/CO alarm accurately 

simulates smoke conditions and tests the device's functions as

required by Underwriters Laboratories.

UL 2034 Required Alarm Points

1

:

 If the smoke/CO alarm is exposed to 400 ppm of CO, THE 

DEVICE MUST ALARM BETWEEN 4 - 15 MINUTES.

 If the smoke/CO alarm is exposed to 150 ppm of CO, THE 

DEVICE MUST ALARM BETWEEN 10 - 50 MINUTES.

 If the smoke/CO alarm is exposed to 70 ppm of CO, THE DEVICE 

MUST ALARM BETWEEN 60 - 240 MINUTES.

The device is designed not to alarm when exposed to a constant

level of 30 ppm for 30 days.

 


background image

550-0496

Pg. 5-11

Product Installation Notes

This page intentionally left blank.

 


background image

Product Installation Notes

This page intentionally left blank.

550-0496

Pg. 5-12