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4MOMS GoodNight User Manual

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Category: Baby Monitor
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background image

GoodNight
Sleep
Trainer


4moms
logo



Welcome
to
the
guide
to
a
GoodNight
of
Sleep.




Thank
you
for
purchasing
the
4moms
Goodnight
Sleep
Trainer.

Here
at
4moms,
we


understand
that
one
of
the
biggest
challenges
new
parents
face
is
getting
their
baby


to
sleep
through
the
night.

Sleep
experts
have
written
dozens
of
books
that
detail


proven
methods
to
help
your
child
sleep
through
the
night,
but,
let’s
face
it,
it’s
not


easy
to
remember
the
details
of
a
book
you
read
when
it’s
4AM
and
your
baby
is


crying.

That’s
why
we’ve
worked
closely
with
a
pediatrician
to
take
these
proven


methods
and
put
them
into
a
simple
to
use
hand‐held
device—the
GoodNight
Sleep


Trainer.




INSTRUCTIONS

Model
#


[picture
of
4
moms]










 


background image

T

HIS
DEVICE
COMPLIES
WITH


P

ART


15


OF
THE


FCC

R

ULES

.





O

PERATION
IS
SUBJECT
TO
THE


FOLLOWING
TWO
CONDITIONS

:





(1)


THIS
DEVICE
MAY
NOT
CAUSE
HARMFUL
INTERFERENCE

,


AND


(2)


THIS
DEVICE
MUST
ACCEPT
ANY
INTERFERENCE
RECEIVED

,


INCLUDING
INTERFERENCE
THAT


MAY
CAUSE
UNDESIRED
OPERATION

.



W

ARNING

:





C

HANGES
OR
MODIFICATIONS
TO
THIS
UNIT
NOT
EXPRESSLY
APPROVED
BY


T

HORLEY


I

NDUSTRIES
D

/

B

/

A


4

MOMS
COULD
VOID
THE
USER

S
AUTHORITY
TO
OPERATE
THE


EQUIPMENT

.



N

OTE

:





T

HIS
EQUIPMENT
HAS
BEEN
TESTED
AND
FOUND
TO
COMPLY
WITH
THE
LIMITS
FOR
A


C

LASS


B


DIGITAL
DEVICE

,


PURSUANT
TO
PART


15


OF
THE


FCC

R

ULES

.





T

HESE
LIMITS
ARE


DESIGNED
TO
PROVIDE
REASONABLE
PROTECTION
AGAINST
HARMFUL
INTERFERENCE
IN
A

RESIDENTIAL
INSTALLATION

.





T

HIS
EQUIPMENT
GENERATES

,


USES
AND
CAN
RADIATE
RADIO


FREQUENCY
ENERGY
AND

,


IF
NOT
INSTALLED
AND
USED
IN
ACCORDANCE
WITH
THE


INSTRUCTIONS

,


MAY
CAUSE
HARMFUL
INTERFERENCE
TO
RADIO
COMMUNICATIONS

.





H

OWEVER

,

THERE
IS
NO
GUARANTEE
THAT
INTERFERENCE
WILL
NOT
OCCUR
IN
A
PARTICULAR

INSTALLATION

.





I

F
THIS
EQUIPMENT
DOES
CAUSE
HARMFUL
INTERFERENCE
TO
RADIO
OR


TELEVISION
RECEPTION

,


WHICH
CAN
BE
DETERMINED
BY
TURNING
THE
EQUIPMENT
OFF
AND
ON

,

THE
USER
IS
ENCOURAGED
TO
TRY
TO
CORRECT
THE
INTERFERENCE
BY
ONE
OR
MORE
OF
THE

FOLLOWING
MEASURES

:


­

R

EORIENT
OR
RELOCATE
THE
RECEIVING
ANTENNA

.


­

I

NCREASE
THE
SEPARATION
BETWEEN
THE
EQUIPMENT
AND
RECEIVER

­

C

ONNECT
THE
EQUIPMENT
INTO
AN
OUTLET
ON
A
CIRCUIT
DIFFERENT
FROM


THAT
TO
WHICH
THE
RECEIVER
IS
CONNECTED

.


­

C

ONSULT
THE
DEALER
OR
AN
EXPERIENCED
RADIO

/TV


TECHNICIAN
FOR
HELP

.













 


background image

Table
of
Contents


Preface:


Welcome
message
from
Dr.
Tucker
.
.
.
.
.
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.
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ii


Chapter
1:


Use
and
Operation
.
.
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Chapter
2:


 The
Science
of
Sleep
.
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Chapter
3:


 The
Value
of
a
GoodNight
of
Sleep
.
.
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.


Chapter
4:


 Frequently
Asked
Questions
.
.
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.


Chapter
5:


Problems
and
Solutions.
.
.
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.





Chapter
6:


Technical
Information
.
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.



Appendix



















 


background image

[Letter
from
Dr.
Tucker]


Congratulations
on
your
new
baby!



This
is
both
an
exciting
and
challenging
time
for
you.

If
you
feel
that
lack
of
sleep
is


preventing
you
and
your
child
from
fully
enjoying
these
precious
moments
together,

you
are
not
alone.

As
a
pediatrician
for
more
than
26
years,
I
have
listened
to
the

concerns
of
hundreds
of
exhausted
new—and
some
not
so
new—moms
and
dads
and


have
helped
these
families
get
the
sleep
they
all
need.


When
we
sleep,
we
naturally
cycle
between
deep
sleep
and
light
sleep.

But
babies
can

accidentally
become
fully
awake
during
this
process.

Medical
science
has
proven


sleeping
through
the
night
is
a
learned
skill
that
can
be
taught
to
babies—just
like
we

help
them
learn
to
walk
and
talk.


The
key
element
in
learning
how
to
sleep
through
the
night
is
for
babies
to
fall
asleep

under
the
same
conditions
they
will
experience
if
they
come
to
a
lighter
stage
of
sleep

during
the
night.

Babies
who
fall
asleep
at
the
bottle
or
breast
or
in
someone’s
arms


do
not
stay
asleep
as
well
as
babies
who
fall
asleep
by
themselves.


Let
me
explain
why
with
an
example
we
all
can
appreciate.

If
you
are
used
to
falling

asleep
with
a
pillow
you’ve
probably
experienced
a
night
when
you
wake
up
and


realize
something
is
wrong.

Your
pillow
is
missing.

If
it
has
slipped
to
the
floor
you

pick
it
up
and
go
right
back
to
sleep.

But
what
if
your
pillow
was
no
where
to
be


found?

You
would
turn
on
the
light,
search
under
the
bed,
get
upset
and
not
be
able
to

go
back
to
sleep.

That’s
how
babies
feel
when
they’re
used
to
falling
asleep
with
mom

and
dad.



The
process
of
sleep
training
involves
maintaining
a
balance
between
letting
the
child

cry—so
that
they
learn
how
to
put
themselves
to
sleep
on
their
own,
and
providing


comfort—so
that
the
child
gets
parental
support.



And
that’s
why
the
GoodNight
Sleep
Trainer
was
developed.

In
my
experience,
most

families
get
excellent
results
in
less
than
two
weeks.

Be
sure
to
read
the
manual
so
you


understand
how
to
use
the
Goodnight
Sleep
Trainer
properly
and
safely.

Your
baby

needs
a
good
night’s
sleep
and
so
do
you.


Pleasant
dreams,


Dr.
Jim
Tucker




 


background image

Chapter
1:

Important
Safety
Instructions


The
GoodNight
Sleep
Trainer
is
intended
as
an
aid
in
teaching
children
who
are
at

least
3
months
old
to
sleep
through
the
night.

It
is
not
a
substitute
for
a
parent’s


best
judgment
and
supervision
–
but
if
your
pediatrician
tells
you
not
to
use
the

sleep
training
method
with
your
child,
please
take
their
advice!

The
manufacturer

and
distributors
of
the
GoodNight
Sleep
Trainer
cannot
be
held
responsible
for
the


improper
care
of
a
child.


Most
children’s
digestive
systems
are
sufficiently
developed
at
the
age
of
three


months
that
they
can
sleep
through
the
night
without
needing
a
feeding.


If
there
is

some
reason
you
think
this
might
not
be
the
case
for
your
baby,
please
consult
your


pediatrician
before
using
the
GoodNight
Sleep
Method.

This
is
especially
true
with

babies
who
were
born
prematurely
or
children
with
special
needs.


To
avoid
Sudden
Infant
Death
Syndrome
(SIDS),
experts
recommend
always
putting

your
baby
to
sleep
on
his
or
her
back.




The
GoodNight
Sleep
Method
should
not
be
used
when
your
child
is
ill,
teething,

experiencing
a
lot
of
stress,
or
tackling
another
major
skill
such
as
walking
or


crawling.


The
GoodNight
Sleep
Trainer
is
not
a
toy.

It
is
intended
for
adult
use
only
and


should
not
be
left
in
a
child’s
crib.


Warning:

To
prevent
fire
or
shock
hazard,
do
not
expose
the
GoodNight
Sleep

Trainer
to
rain
or
moisture.



 


background image

Chapter
2:

The
GoodNight
Sleep
Method


2.1


Teaching
your
baby
to
sleep


There
are
dozens
of
references
available
on
teaching
your
child
to
sleep
through
the


night.

Fortunately,
instead
of
reading
them
all,
you
can
follow
three
simple
steps:


(1
)


 Decide
what
you
want
your
child
to
associate
with
sleep.




(2)


 Follow
the
GoodNight
Sleep
Method:

teach
your
child
to
fall
asleep


with
the
new
sleep
associations
by
balancing
their
need
for

reassurance
with
their
need
for
independent
learning
and
growth.


(3)


 Track
your
progress
over
time.


2.2


Nobody
sleeps
through
the
night.


Even
before
you
had
a
baby,
you
woke
up
about
every
90
minutes
during
the
night.



The
most
likely
reason
you
don’t
remember
this
is
that,
after
a
quick
check
on
our

surroundings,
we
fall
right
back
to
sleep.

(The
second
most
likely
reason
you
don’t

remember
is
that
it’s
been
that
long
since
you
actually
had
a
good
night
of
sleep).

Adults,
children,
and
babies
all
wake
up
several
times
per
night.

There
are
five

levels
of
sleep,
all
of
which
are
required
for
our
body
and
brain
to
function
properly.



We
cycle
between
the
four
stages
of
deep
sleep
and
a
light
rapid
eye
movement

(REM)
sleep.

At
the
end
of
the
REM
portion
of
our
sleep
cycle,
we
naturally
wake
up


briefly.


Around
3
months,
most
babies
no
longer
need
to
eat
during
the
night,
though
they


may
still
enjoy
a
midnight
(or
3am)
snack.

Once
your
pediatrician
has
advised
you

that
these
feedings
are
no
longer
necessary,
you
can
start
the
GoodNight
Sleep

Method.

2.3


Going
to
sleep
is
a
learned
behavior.

It’s
a
commonly
held
misconception
that
sleeping
is
like
breathing,
something
we

are
born
knowing
how
to
do.

As
a
new
parent,
nobody
needs
to
tell
you
that’s
not


true,
or
at
least,
not
the
whole
truth.

While
babies
instinctively
know
how
to
sleep,

they
need
to
learn
to
fall
asleep.




Just
as
your
child
must
learn
to
master
skills
like
crawling
or
walking,
they
also
need

to
learn
to
sleep.

In
fact,
the
amount
of
effort
involved
in
learning
to
“fall”
asleep
is

one
of
the
ironies
of
the
English
language.


2.4


Sleep
associations
are
how
we
learn
to
sleep


There
is
some
good
news
here.

While
there’s
not
much
you
can
do
to
teach
your

baby
to
crawl
or
walk,
you
can
teach
your
child
to
fall
asleep.

In
fact,
each
and
every


time
your
child
goes
to
sleep,
you
are
giving
a
lesson
in
what
is
necessary
for
falling

asleep.

Sleep
associations
are
all
the
things
your
child
associates
with
falling
asleep.



 


background image

Whether
you
nurse,
rock,
or
recite
poetry
in
Greek
to
your
child,
this
is
what
you
are

teaching
your
child
is
necessary
to
fall
asleep.




There
is
nothing
wrong
with
sleep
associations.

Even
adults
have
sleep

associations.

For
example—try
to
go
to
sleep
without
a
pillow.

Sleep
associations


only
become
a
problem
when
they’re
not
readily
available
during
our
regular

nighttime
wakenings.


To
use
the
pillow
example,
usually
you
wake
briefly
during


your
sleep
cycle,
roll
over
and
fall
back
to
sleep,
and
never
remember
anything.

But

if
somebody
snatched
your
pillow
while
you
were
sleeping,
the
next
time
you
woke

up,
you’d
notice
your
pillow
was
missing
and
would
need
to
look
for
it
before
going


back
to
sleep.

If
this
happened
often
enough,
it
might
make
you
quite
grumpy
by

morning.




Now
think
of
your
child’s
sleep
associations.

The
way
that
your
child
falls
asleep

when
you
put
him
or
her
to
bed
for
the
night
(or
even
down
for
a
nap),
is
also
what


your
child
will
expect
when
he
or
she
wakes
each
time
throughout
the
night.

Think

back
to
the
pillow
example.

It’s
no
wonder
your
child
wakes
up
crying
if
he
fell

asleep
in
your
arms
and
woke
up
in
a
crib
or
if
he
dozed
off
with
a
bottle
and
woke


up
to
find
it
gone.

Remember
that
each
time
your
child
falls
asleep,
he
or
she
is

building
a
sleep
association
based
on
this
experience.





2.5


Choose
which
sleep
associations
to
keep
and
which
to
discard.


Sleep
associations
are
very
helpful
because
they
help
signal
to
your
child
that
it
is

time
to
settle
down
to
sleep.

After
9
months
in
the
womb,
your
child
already
has

some
sleep
associations.

This
is
why
movement
(e.g.
being
rocked),
white
noise
(e.g.


riding
in
a
car),
and
having
Mommy
or
Daddy
close
by
are
so
successful
at
lulling

babies
to
sleep.

However,
all
of
these
sleep
associations
are
outside
your
child’s


control.

Teach
your
child
to
associate
sleep
with
new
conditions
that
they
can

control.


Since
your
goal
is
to
get
your
child
to
fall
back
to
sleep
peacefully
at
each
nighttime

wakening,
try
working
backwards
from
here.

If
your
child
sleeps
in
a
crib
in
a
dark

and
quiet
nursery,
these
will
be
some
of
your
child’s
sleep
associations.





We’ve
found
that
some
sleep
associations
work
really
well,
while
others
are
to
be


avoided.




•  A
dark
and
quiet
crib
is
the
best
sleep
association
for
an
infant.

This
means
that


they
need
to
be
put
to
bed
while
drowsy
but
awake.

A
2004
study
commissioned

by
the
National
Sleep
Foundation
found
that,
on
average,
children
who
were
put

to
bed
awake
slept
over
an
hour
more
per
night
than
their
peers
who
were
put


to
bed
after
falling
asleep.

The
study
also
found
that
babies
who
were
put
to
bed

while
awake
were
twice
as
likely
to
sleep
through
the
night
while
babies
who


were
put
to
bed
while
asleep
were
almost
three
times
as
likely
to
need
their

parents’
help
two
or
more
times
per
night!


 


background image

•  For
a
slightly
older
infant
or
toddler,
a
“lovey”,
a
special
blanket
or
stuffed


animal,
that
has
a
familiar
smell
can
help
baby
feel
secure
and
cozy
in
bed.

Make


sure
that
whatever
you
choose
is
safe
for
infants
with
no
small
parts
that
can
fall

off
and
become
choking
hazards.

Also,
follow
all
the
guidelines
for
preventing


SIDS
and
avoid
any
stuffed
animal
that
can
cover
a
young
child’s
face.

Talk
to

your
pediatrician
for
more
suggestions
on
a
lovey.

Our
advice—a
lovey
can
be

worth
it’s
weight
in
gold,
so
make
sure
you
buy
a
stunt
double
so
that
you
can


wash
the
lovey
and
have
a
replacement
in
case
one
gets
lost.


•  The
American
Academy
of
Pediatrics
recommends
that
parents
consider
using
a


pacifier
at
nap
time
and
bedtime
during
the
first
year
because
pacifier
use
during

sleep
is
associated
with
a
reduced
risk
of
SIDS.

This
is
a
decision
that’s
up
to
you.



A
pacifier
can
help
an
infant
settle
down
to
sleep,
but
if
you
introduce
this
sleep

association
now,
you
will
eventually
have
to
break
your
toddler
of
this
sleep

association.


•  Avoid
offering
food
or
drink
to
your
child
while
he
or
she
is
going
to
sleep.

This


can
eventually
lead
to
cavities
in
your
child’s
teeth.

Also,
eating
when
not


hungry
(just
to
help
to
fall
asleep)
is
an
unhealthy
habit,
and
perhaps
one
reason

poor
sleep
habits
have
been
linked
to
childhood
obesity.


•  Avoid
sleep
associations
with
being
held
or
rocked
to
sleep,
driving
around
in


the
car,
or
sleeping
in
a
swing.

None
of
these
sleep
associations
are
sustainable


(unless
you’re
planning
on
sending
your
child
on
a
long
space
mission)
and
all

are
outside
your
child’s
control.


•  Avoid
being
present
in
the
same
room
as
your
child
as
he
or
she
falls
asleep


unless
you
plan
on
being
present
all
the
time
he
or
she
is
asleep
for
a
long
time


(several
years).

Remember—your
child
will
expect
to
find
everything
the
same

as
when
he
or
she
dozed
off
every
time
they
wake
during
their
sleep
cycle.


•  ALWAYS
PUT
YOUR
CHILD
TO
SLEEP
ON
THEIR
BACK!

Putting
a
child
to


sleep
on
their
side
or
stomach
increases
the
risk
of
Sudden
Infant
Death


Syndrome
or
SIDS.

See
the
Appendix
for
other
SIDS
prevention
tips
from
the

American
Academy
of
Pediatrics.




 


background image

Chapter
3:
 How
to
Use
the
GoodNight
Sleep
Trainer

Here’s
how
the
GoodNight
Sleep
Trainer
works.

Rather
than
staying
with
your
child

until
he
or
she
falls
asleep,
the
GoodNight
Sleep
Trainer
encourages
you
to
leave
the


room,
but
make
brief
checks
at
specific
intervals
to
make
sure
your
child
is
okay
and

to
reassure
your
child
that
his
cries
are
not
being
ignored.

Each
visit
should
be
brief.


Remember
that
you
do
not
want
your
baby
to
fall
asleep
with
you
present.

Nor
do


you
want
to
restart
your
baby’s
self‐soothing
process
by
picking
him
up
or
rocking

him.

Simply
check
to
make
sure
that
your
baby
is
safe
and
healthy
and
reassure
him

with
a
quick
“Everything
is
okay.

Go
to
sleep.”



3.1



Teaching
your
baby
to
sleep
using
the
GoodNight
Sleep
Method:



1. 

Put
your
child
down
to
sleep
while
drowsy
but
awake.

All
the
sleep

associations
should
be
consistent
with
your
goals.

(For
more
on
establishing


good
sleep
associations,
see
Chapter
2)


2. 

If
your
baby
starts
crying,
press
the
“Crying”
button
to
switch
the
GoodNight

Sleep
Trainer
into
teaching
mode.

This
will
start
a
timer.

Wait
until
the


timer
finishes.


3. 

Go
check
on
your
baby
to
reassure
both
yourself
and
your
child
that


everything
is
okay.


4. 

Press
the
top
“Done
Checking”
button.

This
will
reset
the
timer
and
alarm.


Again,
wait
until
the
timer
finishes.


5. 

Repeat
steps
3
and
4
until
your
baby
quiets
down
and
falls
asleep.

Once
that

happens,
press
the
“Down
to
Sleep”
button.




If
the
timer
goes
off
just
as
your
baby
is
finally
settling
down
to
sleep,
feel
free
to

wait
a
few
minutes
before
peeking
in.



Remember
that
no
schedule
or
device
should
replace
your
best
judgment.

If
you

think
you
need
to
go
in
to
check
before
the
timer
is
done,
please
go
check!



Teaching
sleep
associations
is
easier
with
younger
infants
but,
with
practice
and

persistence,
can
be
done
at
any
age.

We
assume
that
your
child
is
still
an
infant
and


confined
to
a
crib,
but
the
plan
can
be
adapted
to
odder
toddlers
as
well,
though
you

may
need
a
safety
gate
to
keep
your
child
in
his
or
her
room.



Remember
that
the
only
times
you
get
to
teach
your
baby
how
to
sleep
through
the

night
is
when
he
or
she
is
actually
trying
to
fall
asleep.

Once
he
or
she
is
asleep,
the


teaching
opportunity
is
over.

The
flip
side
to
this
is
that
every
time
your
child
falls

asleep,
he
or
she
is
learning.

Consistency
is
key.




By
following
the
GoodNight
Sleep
Trainer’s
approach
of
progressive
waiting,
you

can
help
your
child
to
learn
this
important
life
skill
while
still
providing
the
parental


support
and
reassurance
that
your
baby
needs.


 


background image

When
you
put
your
child
to
bed
using
the
new
sleep
associations,
it
is
likely
that
he

or
she
will
shed
some
tears.

This
is
a
challenging
time
for
you
as
a
parent,
because


you
know
what
sleep
associations
will
settle
your
baby
down
to
sleep
and
nobody

wants
to
see
their
child
frustrated
and
unhappy.

Take
heart!


•  The
GoodNight
Sleep
method
does
work.

Within
10
days,
nearly
all
parents


report
that
their
child
is
sleeping
through
the
night.

Most
parents
report


significant
improvements
in
just
3‐4
days.


•  This
is
good
for
your
child.

Once
your
child
masters
the
skill
of
falling
asleep
on


her
own,
she
will
sleep
better
which
has
been
linked
to
many
health
and


cognitive
benefits.

Also,
you
waking
up
several
times
during
the
night
isn’t
any

better
for
your
baby
than
it
is
for
you—you
will
be
a
better
parent
when
you
are


not
exhausted
and
cranky.


•  Many
other
parents
have
gone
through
this
process
and
are
cheering
for
you
and


your
baby.



3.2


 Tips
to
make
your
use
of
the
GoodNight
Sleep
Trainer
more
successful


• 

Develop
a
loving
bedtime
routine.

A
bedtime
routine
is
like
a
sleep
association

in
that
it
conditions
your
baby
to
be
ready
to
go
to
sleep.

Develop
a
routine


that
works
for
you
and
your
baby.

Some
suggestions
include
taking
a
warm

bath,
reading
books
together,
brushing
teeth,
and
playing
soft
music.

Avoid

television
or
stimulating
activities
such
as
roughhousing.

Pick
a
start
time
for


your
routine
and
try
to
stick
to
it
making
this
time
peaceful
and
calming
for

you
and
your
baby.

• 

Maintain
a
regular
daytime
schedule.

Keeping
a
predictable
schedule
for


feeding,
naptimes,
and
activities
during
the
day
(on
both
weekdays
and

weekends)
helps
your
baby
to
set
his
or
her
internal
clock
which
will
make


going
to
sleep
at
night
easier.


• 

Follow
your
baby’s
lead
and
put
your
child
to
sleep
when
he
or
she
is
tired.

If

you
try
to
put
your
child
to
bed
while
he
is
still
wide
awake,
he
won’t
be
able


to
settle
down
to
sleep
and
will
associate
the
crib
with
being
awake.

On
the

other
hand,
if
you
ignore
your
child’s
cues
that
it’s
time
for
bed,
your
child


will
get
a
“second
wind”
even
though
he
would
benefit
from
an
earlier

bedtime.





3.3


Track
your
progress



Use
the
GoodNight
Sleep
Trainer
to
keep
track
of
what
time
your
child
goes
to
bed,


gets
up
in
the
morning,
naps,
and
any
nighttime
awakenings.

Simply
press
“Down
to

Sleep”
whenever
your
child
falls
asleep
and
“Up
to
Play”
when
your
child
wakes
up.



The
GoodNight
Sleep
Trainer
logs
all
the
data.

With
a
computer,
a
USB
cable,
and
an

internet
connection,
you
can
use
our
website
to
view
your
child’s
data
over
time,

spot
trends,
and
compare
your
child’s
data
to
national
averages.

You
can
also
trade


advice
with
other
parents
or
request
help.


 


background image

Although
the
steps
outlined
above
are
simple
and
logical,
they’re
not
always
easy.


Just
like
learning
to
crawl,
walk,
or
any
other
new
skill,
learning
to
go
to
sleep
is
sure


to
cause
some
tears
of
frustration
for
your
baby
(and
sometimes
some
for
you
too).


With
the
GoodNight
Sleep
Trainer,
you
have
support
every
step
of
the
way.


 


background image

Chapter
4:

Frequently
Asked
Questions


How
long
does
it
take
the
GoodNight
Sleep
Method
to
work?


Most
parents
report
significant
improvements
in
just
2‐4
days.

Within
10
days,


nearly
all
parents
report
that
their
child
is
sleeping
through
the
night.

If
you
do
not

see
an
improvement
in
10
days,
talk
to
your
doctor
(there
are
tools
on
the
website


for
sharing
your
data
with
your
pediatrician).


Will
the
GoodNight
Sleep
Method
work
if
I’m
breastfeeding?

Absolutely.

Whether
you
are
breastfeeding
or
bottle
feeding,
try
to
keep
your
baby

awake
until
the
end
of
the
feeding
session
and
then
follow
the
GoodNight
Sleep


Method
for
putting
your
baby
to
sleep
drowsy
but
awake.


How
long
should
I
spend
in
my
baby’s
room
at
each
CHECK
in
the
GoodNight
Sleep


Method?


Each
visit
should
be
brief.

Remember
that
you
do
not
want
your
baby
to
fall
asleep

with
you
present.

Nor
do
you
want
to
restart
your
baby’s
self
soothing
process
by

picking
him
up
or
rocking
him.

If
your
child
has
thrown
a
lovey
to
the
floor,
you
can


retrieve
it,
but
if
he
throws
it
again,
leave
it
there
until
the
next
time
you
come
to

check
on
him.

Simply
check
to
make
sure
that
your
baby
is
safe
and
healthy
and

reassure
him
with
a
quick
“Everything
is
okay.

Go
to
sleep.”

How
long
should
my
baby
be
sleeping?


This
varies
from
child
to
child
but
some
averages
can
be
found
in
the
chart
below


Age 

Nighttime Sleep 

(hours) 

Daytime Sleep 

(hours) 

Total Sleep 

(hours) 

1 month 

8.5 (many naps) 

7.5 (many naps) 

16 

3 months 

6-10 

5-9 

15 

6 months 

10-12 

3-4.5 

14.5 

9 months 

11 

3 (2 naps) 

14 

12 months 

11 

2.5 (2 naps) 

13.5 

18 months 

11 

2.5 (1-2 naps) 

13.5 

2 years 

11 

2 (1 nap) 

13 

3 years 

10.5 

1.5 (1 nap) 

12 

4 years 

11.5 

11.5 

 


background image

If
your
baby
seems
to
be
getting
too
much
or
too
little
sleep
(more
than
an
hour

difference
than
the
range
for
his
or
her
age),
talk
to
your
pediatrician
about
your

concerns
since
it
could
be
indicative
of
another
problem.


My
child
sleeps
in
a
regular
bed.

Can
we
still
use
the
GoodNight
Sleep
Trainer?


Teaching
sleep
associations
is
easier
with
younger
infants
but,
with
practice
and

persistence,
can
be
done
at
any
age.

We
assume
that
your
child
is
still
an
infant
and


confined
to
a
crib,
but
the
plan
can
be
adapted
to
older
toddlers
as
well,
though
you

may
need
a
safety
gate
to
keep
your
child
in
his
or
her
room.


Question:
I've
read
that
letting
a
baby
"cry
it
out"
can
cause
all
sorts
of
problems­­will

the
GoodNight
Sleep
Method
hurt
my
baby?

We've
researched
all
the
studies
and
articles
we
could
find
on
possible
damage
to

babies
from
crying.

We
have
found
many
studies
that
show
the
benefits
for
your


baby
of
getting
the
necessary
amount
of
sleep,
studies
that
show
that
insufficient

sleep
is
harmful,
but
no
studies
that
indicate
that
the
GoodNight
Sleep
Method
will

harm
your
child's
development.

The
most
common
study
used
to
"prove"
that


crying
is
harmful
to
children
referenced
extreme
examples
where
babies
were
kept

without
being
held,
nurtured,
or
given
visual
stimuli,
which
was
then
extrapolated


to
the
average,
loving
American
home.
Sleep
and
the
brain
are
imperfectly

understood
areas
of
medicine,
so
it's
natural
that
there
are
differences
of
opinion.


However,
the
experts
within
the
medical
community
that
we've
consulted
agree


that
the
GoodNight
Sleep
Method
is
completely
safe
as
long
as
it's
properly
used.


My
doctor
has
told
me
my
child
needs
special
care,
should
I
still
use
the
GoodNight

Sleep
Method?




No.

Discontinue
use
of
the
product
immediately
as
your
pediatrician
knows
your

child
better
than
we
do.


My
child
is
3
months
old
but
still
small
for
her
age
and
my
pediatrician
says
she
needs

to
eat
at
least
once
during
the
night.

Can
we
still
use
the
GoodNight
Sleep
Method?


No.

The
GoodNight
Sleep
Method
is
intended
for
babies
who
no
longer
require

nutrition
during
the
night.

You
can
still
use
the
product
to
track
her
sleep
cycles
but


should
follow
your
pediatrician’s
advice
and
hold
off
on
sleeping
through
the
night.

 


background image

Chapter
5:

Technical
information


Insert
Numbered
Drawing
&
description
here
(similar
to
itzbeen)


Batteries:
The
GoodNight
Sleep
Trainer
requires
3
AA
batteries
(not
included).



Replace
batteries
when
the
battery
indicator
shows
that
the
battery
is
low



(PICTURE)


Clock:

To
set
the
clock
or
day
in
the
training
cycle,
hold
the
“DONE
CHECKING”


button
on
the
top
of
the
unit
for
3
seconds.

The
unit
will
enter
SET
mode.

Press

Button
1
on
the
front
of
the
unit
to
advance
the
Day
in
the
training
cycle.

Press

Button
2
on
the
front
of
the
unit
to
advance
the
Hour.

Press
Button
3
to
advance
the


minute.

When
everything
is
set
correctly,
press
the
“DONE
CHECKING”
button
on

the
top
of
the
unit
again
to
return
to
normal
mode.


Note
that
the
unit
automatically
enters
SET
mode
when
the
batteries
are
removed
and

replaced.

Uploading
data
to
the
website:

With
a
computer
running
Windows
XP
or

Windows
Vista
with
an
internet
connection
and
a
USB
cable
(neither
of
which
are


included),
the
GoodNight
Sleep
Trainer
can
upload
the
data
online.

It
is
not

necessary
to
install
any
software
onto
your
computer.


Note
that
this
version
of
the
GoodNight
Sleep
Trainer
is
not
compatible
with


computers
running
Mac
OS,
Linux
or
a
version
of
Windows
other
than
those
listed.


Step
1:
Plug
the
USB
cable
into
the
USB
port
on
the
GoodNight
Sleep
Trainer
(PIC)


Step
2:
Plug
the
other
end
of
the
USB
cable
into
a
free
USB
port
on
your
computer.


Step
3:
The
GoodNight
Sleep
Trainer
should
automatically
launch
a
web
browser
to


www.goodnightsleeptrainer.com


and
generate
a
file
“goodnightsleeptrainer.dat”
on


your
desktop.

If
this
does
not
happen
automatically,
open
“My
Computer”
in
the

Explorer
and
double
click
on
the
GoodNight
Sleep
Trainer
icon.

For
more


information
and
troubleshooting,
please
see
our
website:


www.goodnightsleeptrainer.com

Step
4:
Create
a
free
account
to
login
to
the
website.




Step
5:
Click
the
button
to
upload
data
to
the
website.



Step
6:
When
you
are
done,
you
can
delete
the
file
“goodnightsleeptrainer.dat”
from

your
computer.


 


background image

Thorley
Industries,
LLC
d/b/a
4moms


40
24

th


Street,
5

th


Floor


Pittsburgh,
PA
15222


http://www.4momsonline.com/


©
2008
Thorley
Industries,
LLC.

All
Rights
Reserved.



U.S.
and
International
Patents
Pending


Goodnight
Sleep
Trainer,
4moms,
and
the
4moms
logo
are
trademarks
of
Thorley

Industries,
LLC.


Thorley
Industries,
LLC
warrants
that
this
product
will
be
free
from
manufacturing

defects
for
a
period
of
90
days
from
original
purchase.

No
other
warranty
is


expressed
or
implied.

If
the
product
fails
to
function
properly
within
this
timeframe,

call
4moms
toll‐free
at
(888)43‐4moms
for
instructions
on
how
to
obtain
a

replacement.

No
refunds
will
be
issued.



Please
register
this
product
on‐line
at


http://www.4momsonline.com/productregistration


so
we
can
communicate
with


you
if
necessary.