PDF User Manual

  1. Home
  2. Manuals
  3. 1-CUBE GMA Quick Manual

1-CUBE GMA Quick Manual

Made by: 1-CUBE
Type: Quick Guide
Category: Measuring Instruments
Pages: 2
Size: 0.13 MB

 

Download PDF User Manual


Related Product Video

 

Full Text Searchable PDF User Manual



background image

Quick Guide for using a 1-CUBE GMA Dissolved CO

2

 Carbonation Analyser

 for Beer and Cider 

Also read the User’s Guide  

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 
To start measuring the dissolved CO

2

 in a sample, first take a sample from a tank as follows: 

It will help if you watch this YouTube video: 

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=z_M7LpkEv1Q

  

1)  Direct the outlet hose to a suitable drain or waste beer collection container 
2)  To clean any debris from inside the tank outlet valve, open the tank sampling valve. Allow 

beer to flow out to waste for a short time. Close the tank sampling valve

3)  Connect the inlet hose to the tank sampling valve. If necessary, secure with a clip or cable tie to 

achieve a gas tight seal. Remember to allow for the pressure in the tank, it will be applied to the 
hose. 

4)  Fully Open the tank sampling valve and Fully Open the GMA inlet valve  
5)  Gently Open the GMA outlet valve until beer starts to flow. Adjust the outlet valve until a slow 

and steady flow is achieved to flush through and fill the chamber with new beer. Normally allow 
the beer to flow for at least 30 seconds, and until the beer flows clear in the chamber.  

6)  Fully Close the GMA outlet valve. Then Fully close the inlet valve. 

You now have your sample for analysis with the instrument, but the beer in the chamber is under 
pressure, notice the gauge. This excess pressure must be released, otherwise our equilibrium pressure 
reading will be wrong

7)  Open the outlet valve for a short time (about 1 sec.) Close the valve. Excess gas will have 

released. The pressure should now be about zero or just above.  

8)  Rotate and unlock the black plunger on top of the GMA, so that the plunger can move up & 

down. Notice the position of the white dot and the locked position. 

9)  Fully lift the plunger and push down hard, repeat for THREE full strokes in quick 

succession. (Only three times. No more and no less!). NOTE: On each stroke you will see gas 
being released from solution inside the chamber. 

10) After the third down stroke rotate and lock the plunger  
11) In theory partial pressure equilibrium has been reached. Notice how the pressure in the chamber 

has increased. This is because dissolved gas has come out of solution. 

12) Switch on the digital thermometer and read the temperature.  
13) Read the pressure in kPa 
14) To calculate the dissolve CO

2

 content, line up the pressure and temperature on the rotary 

nomogram on the base of the instrument. Read off the CO

2

 content in g/l 

NOTE: 1 g/l = 0.506 %vol. 1%vol = 1.976 g/l.  

To measure another tank, re-connect the GMA and repeat the steps above. The new beer sample 
will push out the previous beer. 

 

Continued…please read on, cleaning is important! 

INLET 

OUTLET 

CO

2

 release PLUNGER 

Digital Thermometer 

Pressure Gauge 

Note the inlet tube 

GMA 

by 1-CUBE 

 


background image

 

Finally REMEMBER TO CLEAN the GMA after each session.  

1)  Connect the inlet hose to a clean cold water supply (Max. pressure for GMA: 4 bar g).  
2)  Flush through by opening both inlet and outlet valves, with water flowing to drain until the 

chamber is clean. REMEMBER to unlock and pump the gas release plunger several times to 
avoid the piston becoming stuck with dry beer. Relock the plunger. 
If the plunger does become stuck, unscrew it and soak it in warm water until it frees. 
 

3)  Disconnect the water supply, with the valves still open. Lift the inlet hose and lay the 

instrument on its side so the water drains out via the outlet valve. Finally, turn the instrument 
upside-down to drain the last few drops.  

4)  Close the valve gently and store the unit upright until it is next required.  

Normally cold water is sufficient for cleaning. In severe cases warm water (max. 25°C) or dilute 0.5 to 
max. 1% acetic or peracetic acid or hydrogen peroxide can be used at ambient temp. The GMA has 
brass valves, so do not leave them soaking or in contact with sanitizer for longer than is essential.  
Finally, washout thoroughly with clean water. 
 
Max. Temperature: 25°C. Max. Pressure for GMA: 4 bar g. (notice the gauge limit!)  
 
GMA construction materials: Chamber: PVC-U, Pump: Stainless Steel, Valves: Brass, Hoses: Silicone 
rubber 

 
Application Information  

Just  as  with  other  more  expensive  instruments  in  the  market,  the  dissolved  CO

2

  result  is  a  calculated  value 

based  on  the  measured  pressure  and  temperature  values.  The  calculation  formula  describes  detailed 
observations  and  measurements  of  a  physical  behaviour.  It  was  first  defined  in  1803  by  Dr William  Henry,  as 
‘Henry’s  Law  of  Partial  Pressures’.  The  mathematics  are  very  complex.  Over  the  years  numerous  learned 
people  have  developed  and  improved  various  different  formulae.  Nevertheless,  none  can  give  us  an  absolute 
and  100%  true  value.  Variations  between  different  instruments  and  different  ‘measuring’  methods  are  normal 
and must be expected. 

For  best  results,  a  good  understanding  of  the  physical  behaviour  and  a  consistent  operating  procedure  are 
essential. With this, reliable temperature and pressure measurements should be achievable. Attention should be 
given to achieving both temperature stability and true partial pressure equilibrium, which is not as quick or easy 
as one might think. For example, the temperature of the equipment, the operating environment or the operator’s 
hands  will  adversely  affect  the  beer  temperature  and  thereby  the  pressure.  They  both  influence  the  gas 
solubility.  Ideally  and  before  testing  starts,  the  instrument  should  be  at  exactly  the  same  temperature  as  the 
beer.  Even  the  shortest  exposure  of  the  beer  to  air  will  reduce  the  dissolved  CO

2

  content,  this  is  especially 

significant when testing kegs. The smallest of opening in pipes and seals will allow CO

2

 gas out and O

2

 & N

2

 in, 

even though a beer leak might not be seen

.   

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

We hope you enjoy making great beer, helped a little by your new 1-CUBE instrument. 

There is more equipment for brewers on our websites. 

 

 

 

 

 

www.1-cube.com 
1-cube@1-cube.com